ohio point system

The state of Ohio assesses points against the driving record of drivers who commit certain traffic violations. The Ohio point system aims to deter drivers from committing frequent traffic violations over a short period of time. If you accumulate 12 or more points over a two-year period, you face license suspension. Points and penalties for traffic violations in Ohio are serious charges that can carry steep consequences for drivers. A traffic attorney at Gounaris Abboud, LPA, can explain the process for getting points on your license in Ohio and the potential consequences if you accumulate too many.  Points for Various Violations in Ohio Minor traffic violations warrant the assessment of two points against the driver’s driving record. Ohio considers multiple traffic infractions as minor violations resulting in two points, including: Running a stop sign; Running a traffic light; Driving below the speed limit; Failure to yield; Following too closely; Improper turn; and Speeding less than 25mph over the speed limit. Ohio assesses four points against a driver’s driving record for violations considered more serious or dangerous than those warranting two points. Four-point violations include: Speeding more than 25mph over the speed limit; Operating the vehicle in a willful or wanton manner that exhibits disregard for the safety of persons or property; and Reckless driving. Six-point violations in Ohio include: Street racing; Operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs (OVI); Leaving the scene of an accident; Driving under a suspended license. If a driver accumulates six points on his or her license within a two-year period, the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV) is required to issue a warning letter to the driver, listing the violations and the corresponding number of points for each.  Driver’s License Suspension for Point Violations You could be wondering, how long do points stay on your license in Ohio after you receive traffic violation convictions? In reality, points assessed to your driving record never go away.  However, for purposes of license suspension, points are considered for two years. The two-year period begins on the date of the first conviction. In the event you receive 12 points against your license in a two-year period, your driver’s license is suspended for a period of six months. After the six-month suspension period, you must complete a remedial driving course and pass a driving test to have your license reinstated.  Ohio permits drivers with more than two but less than twelve points to complete a remedial driving instruction course and have two points removed from their record. The remedial driving course can be completed up to five times, but cannot be taken twice within a three-year period.  Consult with a Traffic Lawyer Today An experienced traffic attorney with Gounaris Abboud, LPA, can help you understand your driving record and the Ohio points on license system. Depending on the circumstances of your case, a traffic lawyer can argue to have your driving charge reduced to a zero-point violation. We pride ourselves on providing our clients with the one-on-one attention we believe is necessary to establish trust in an attorney-client relationship. Time is of the essence in every legal claim, so contact our team of traffic attorneys at Gounaris Abboud, LPA, as soon as possible at 937-222-1515 or online. 

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Voyeurism Penelties Ohio

Like every other state, Ohio law criminalizes certain sexual acts. Typically, sex crimes are those sexual acts that violate the rights of others. Often, the rights violated in sex crimes center around a victim’s right to privacy and personal choice. But you be wondering, Is voyeurism illegal? The answer is yes. In fact, voyeurism is a sex crime that centers, almost entirely, on one’s right to privacy.  There is more to Ohio’s voyeurism rules than the fact that voyeurism is illegal. If you face a voyeurism accusation, contact an Ohio sex crime lawyer as soon as possible. Before calling a lawyer, however, read through this piece for a quick breakdown of Ohio’s voyeurism laws brought to you by the legal team at Gounaris Abboud, LPA.  What Is Voyeurism? Different states use different legal terms to define criminal acts. This applies to voyeurism just like any other crime. Consider this general voyeurism definition. Voyeurism occurs when someone achieves or otherwise seeks sexual gratification by watching others engage in sexual activity. As a criminal act, voyeurism occurs when one seeks sexual gratification or pleasure by watching others participate in sexual activities without their consent or knowledge. Voyeurism also includes seeking sexual gratification by watching someone who is not necessarily engaged in a sexual act but is otherwise in a state of nudity or undress without their knowledge or consent. The victim’s lack of consent or knowledge is critical in differentiating between voyeurism as a crime and voyeurism as a legal sexual act. Ohio Voyeurism Laws In Ohio, there are four varying levels of voyeurism severity. The state prosecutes the least severe offense as a third-degree misdemeanor and the highest as a fifth-degree felony. Each of the various levels has a different definition or list of qualifications. All of the levels of voyeurism share the same basic qualifications. To be a crime, voyeurism involves someone who trespasses or surreptitiously invades the privacy of another, or spies or eavesdrops upon another for the purpose of sexually arousing or gratifying themselves.  Voyeurism as a third-degree misdemeanor occurs when someone invades the privacy of another to spy or eavesdrop on them for purposes of sexual gratification or pleasure. As a second-degree misdemeanor, voyeurism is slightly different. Voyeurism as a second-degree misdemeanor occurs when someone, for the purposes of sexually gratifying or arousing themselves, invades the privacy of another to record, film, or otherwise photograph another person in a state of nudity. First-degree misdemeanor voyeurism occurs when someone tries to invade the privacy of another by photographing or viewing their body or undergarments. As a fifth-degree felony, voyeurism occurs when one engages in the same activity noted in the third-degree misdemeanor but does so with a minor as their target.   Penalties for a Voyeurism Conviction The penalties for an Ohio voyeurism conviction differ from one another based on the severity or degree of the crime. The following bulleted list illustrates the maximum penalty for each level of voyeurism conviction: Third-degree misdemeanor: Up to 60 days incarceration, a fine up to $500, or both; Second-degree misdemeanor: Up to 90 days incarceration, a fine of up to $750, or both; First-degree misdemeanor: Up to 180 days incarceration, a fine of up to $1,000, or both; or Fifth-degree felony: A maximum of six to 12 months incarceration, a fine of up to $2,500, or both. It is important to note that each of these categories represents the maximum punishment. Someone convicted of voyeurism will not always face the maximum punishment. Judges consider numerous factors that can mitigate or aggravate the severity of any punishment they hand down. The best way for someone facing a voyeurism charge to avoid the maximum penalty is to hire an experienced sex crimes lawyer who will litigate aggressively on their behalf. Protect Your Freedom with Ohio’s Premier Sex Crime Lawyers If you are facing a voyeurism charge in Ohio, don’t wait for the legal process to unfold before hiring an attorney. Instead, from the moment you are aware that you are under investigation for a crime like voyeurism, retain the services of an experienced sex crime lawyer. An experienced sex crime attorney will help you preserve your freedom and constitutional rights from the moment you hire them. The attorneys at Gounaris Abboud, LPA know the ins and outs of voyeurism charges in Ohio. They can draw on their vast experience to help you achieve the best possible outcome in your case. Preserving our clients’ freedom is our top priority. Let us make your freedom our priority. Contact us today for your free consultation.

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Court Procedures Ohio

If you have been charged with a crime in Ohio, you have certain rights that are guaranteed by the US Constitution and the Ohio Constitution. Many of these rights are reflected in the Ohio Rules of Criminal Procedure, which govern how the criminal justice system must treat you. If you don’t know your rights, you could seriously damage your case.  Stages of an Ohio Criminal Prosecution An Ohio criminal prosecution proceeds through several distinct stages. In all cases, the details of how these stages are executed are based on the Ohio Rules of Criminal Procedure. Following is a breakdown of the stages of an Ohio criminal prosecution. Arrest and Detention An arrest is the first step in a criminal prosecution. The police take you into custody (typically in handcuffs) and read you your Miranda rights (“You have the right to remain silent, anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law, etc.”). The next step is to take you to the police station for booking. Do not talk to the police, even if you are innocent. The police will photograph you, fingerprint you, and request identifying information such as your name and address. They will also catalog and impound your personal belongings until your release. You should call a family member to notify them of your arrest.  How Long Can You be Held in Jail Before Seeing a Judge? Under the Ohio Rules of Criminal Procedure, the authorities must bring you before a judge for an arraignment “without unnecessary delay.” Most jurists understand this to mean 48 to 72 hours. What Is an Arraignment Hearing? Your arraignment is a hearing in front of a judge, during which time: The judge will explain your constitutional rights and the charges against you;  You will enter a formal plea in response to the charges against you—guilty, not guilty, or no contest; and The judge will either set your bail or refuse bail altogether.  If the judge sets bail and you pay it, they will release you until the trial or sentencing hearing (depending on your plea). If the judge refuses bail, you will remain in jail until your case is resolved. If you plead guilty or no contest, no trial will take place and your case will be over as soon as you are sentenced. The Discovery Phase If you plead not guilty at arraignment, the case proceeds to the discovery phase. During this phase, your lawyer asks the prosecutor for any evidence that the prosecution will use against you. Your lawyer can seek a court order if the prosecution refuses to comply.  Plea Bargaining A plea bargain is a deal between you and the prosecution. Although Ohio prosecutors resolve most of their cases through plea bargaining, you can refuse to bargain if you want to. Two types of plea bargaining are possible: Charge bargaining—this is where the prosecution agrees to recommend leniency to the judge for your agreement to plead guilty to a lesser charge (reckless driving instead of DUI, for example), or to only some of the charges against you; and Sentence bargaining—where you plead guilty to the original charges and the prosecutor promises to recommend a lighter sentence to the judge. Although the judge is under no obligation to accept the terms of a plea bargain that is struck between you and the prosecutor, in practice, they almost always agree. The Preliminary Hearing If the prosecution charged you with a felony, you can demand a preliminary hearing. At the hearing, your attorney will probe for weaknesses in the prosecution’s case and argue that the prosecution lacks probable cause to take your case to trial. Unfortunately, this argument usually fails. If so, the judge will set your case for trial. What Is a Pretrial Hearing? In some (but not all) cases, the judge schedules a pre-trial hearing. This is the time for your lawyer to file certain pretrial motions, such as a motion for the suppression of evidence that the police seized illegally. You can also reach a late plea bargain at this stage. Trial At trial, you can call witnesses, cross-examine the prosecution’s witnesses, present evidence, challenge the prosecution’s evidence, and present legal and factual arguments. You can demand a jury trial if you prefer one. Ultimately it is the judge, however, who will determine your exact sentence if you are convicted. Appeal Appeals of criminal convictions are difficult and time-consuming. Even if you win, you will not be exonerated immediately. Instead, the court typically schedules a new trial for you. Only if you win the second time around will you walk free. Let’s Fight Back Together With an aggressive and relentless style, the award-winning criminal defense attorneys at Gounaris Abboud, LPA.,  have won acquittals and dismissals for a multitude of criminal defense clients. Call us at (937) 222-1515 or contact us online for a free case analysis. We maintain offices in Dayton and Springboro, Ohio, and we serve clients throughout the state of Ohio.

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traffic violations in ohio

Are traffic violations criminal offenses? The short answer is that sometimes they are and sometimes they aren’t. Obviously, offenses like vehicular homicide and vehicular manslaughter are criminal traffic violations. Almost as obviously, violations like running a stop sign are not crimes, at least for first offenders. Between those two extremes, however, the criminal status of a traffic violation may be unclear. Ohio Traffic Violations: The Points System Ohio operates a point system to discipline drivers for poor driving. Each driver is allotted 12 points every two years. If the driver commits a traffic violation, the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles will deduct a certain number of points depending on the nature of the offense. In no case, even vehicular manslaughter, are more than six points deducted for a single offense. Even in cases where the underlying offense is a crime, accumulating points on your driver’s license is not itself a crime.  If you accumulate 12 or more points within two years, Ohio will suspend your driver’s license. Although there are ways of avoiding suspension (e.g., traffic school), you do commit a crime by driving on a suspended driver’s license. This is the main way that ordinary moving violations such as running a red light can result in criminal liability. What Traffic Violations Are Criminal Offenses? A great number of traffic violations are also criminal offenses. Too many, in fact, to list here. But here is a list of some of the most commonly committed criminal traffic violations. Aggravated Vehicular Homicide Aggravated Vehicular Homicide occurs when you cause the death of someone due to reckless or intoxicated driving. Reckless driving is something more than mere negligent driving. Aggravated vehicular homicide is a felony that typically carries significant prison time. Driving Under Suspension  Driving Under Suspension or in Violation of License Restriction is a very common offense. Ohio might suspend your driver’s license for traffic violations, for example, or for refusing to take a Breathalyzer test. It might also restrict your driving privileges to driving to and from work, for example. Ohio can charge you with a misdemeanor criminal offense for violating these limitations. Failure to Stop After an Accident Failure to Stop After an Accident on Public Roads or Highways is colloquially known as “leaving the scene of an accident” or, if you caused the accident, “hit and run.” Ohio can charge you with a first-degree misdemeanor, a fifth-degree felony, or a third-degree felony, depending on the circumstances. The prosecutor will hit you hard with this one if you caused the accident, injured someone, and drove away. Willful or Wanton Disregard Operation in Willful or Wanton Disregard of the Safety of Persons or Property is colloquially known as reckless driving. What makes it “reckless” (rather than merely negligent or careless) is your deliberate disregard of the safety or property of others. Depending on the circumstances Ohio can charge you with a minor misdemeanor, a fourth-degree misdemeanor, or a third-degree misdemeanor for this offense. Racing Street Racing is a fairly self-explanatory offense. A police officer doesn’t have to wait for an accident to occur to arrest you for street racing. Street racing is a first-degree misdemeanor. Vehicular Homicide Vehicular Homicide occurs when you cause the death of another person through negligent driving. Ohio can charge vehicular homicide as a first-degree misdemeanor or a fourth-degree felony. If convicted of this crime you might face a mandatory prison term. Additionally, if you cause someone’s death by driving while intoxicated, the state can charge you with aggravated vehicular homicide that carries even stiffer penalties.  Vehicular Manslaughter Vehicular Manslaughter occurs when you cause the death of another person while operating your vehicle in a manner that amounts to a violation of a municipal ordinance or minor, misdemeanor traffic violation. Ohio can charge you with a first-degree or second-degree misdemeanor for this infraction. Failure to Comply Failure to Comply with Order or Signal of a Police Officer, known colloquially as fleeing and eluding, occurs when you drive with the intent to evade the pursuit of a police officer after they signal you to pull over. Ohio can charge you with a first-degree misdemeanor, a fourth-degree felony, or a third-degree felony for this infraction. Let Us Stand By Your Side Traffic violations become more than a nuisance when they turn into criminal offenses. If this happens, you can call upon the services of the award-winning criminal defense attorneys at Gounaris Abboud, LPA. We have won acquittals and dismissals for a great number of criminal defense clients, and favorable plea bargains for many more. Call us at (937) 222-1515 or contact us online for a free case analysis. We have offices in Dayton and Springboro, Ohio, and we serve clients from all over Ohio.

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statute of limitations on forgery signature

If you have signed another person’s name without their knowledge or permission, you may be worried about the possible legal ramifications. You may be wondering what forgery is, whether it is a crime, and, if so, what the statute of limitations on forgery signature crimes is. In this article, we will address those matters and more as we look at the ins and outs of forgery laws in Ohio. Is Forgery of a Signature a Crime? Yes! Forgery laws in Ohio are part of the  Ohio Code of Crimes and Procedures. In these statutes, the judicial system makes it clear that it is a violation of Ohio forgery laws to fabricate or create any writing or portion of a writing. This includes executing or altering a signature. More specifically, the Theft and Fraud Criminal Code states that it is illegal to: Forge any writing of another without the other person’s authority; Forge any writing so that it purports to be genuine when it is not; or Be engaged in issuing, publishing, using, transferring, delivering, displaying, or sending any writing that the person knows to have been forged. Forging, selling, or distributing identification cards (fake IDs) also violates forgery laws in Ohio. Consequences for violating Ohio forgery laws can include fines in the thousands of dollars and prison time. Statute of Limitations on Forgery of a Signature The statute of limitations is the time frame during which law enforcement may bring a case against you after the commission of the crime. The general time limits in Ohio are: Six years for felonies, Two years for misdemeanors, and Six months for minor misdemeanors. While the above is accurate for most cases, there are a few variations, including some crimes involving forgery. For instance, if the forgery offense consists of a breach of fiduciary duty or misconduct by a public servant, law enforcement may have more time to address the crime. It is always critical to have a highly respected attorney review your situation and determine the statute of limitations.  What You Should Do If You Are Facing Forgery Charges If there is any possibility that law enforcement will charge you with forgery or if they already have charged you, you should immediately contact an attorney. Forgery of a signature can create a legal problem that puts your freedom at risk. Therefore, mounting a solid defense right away is crucial. Contact a criminal defense legal team at once, and let them protect and defend you. Look for a reputable firm that will provide a free case analysis. Ohio forgery laws lend themselves to prosecution and punishment. Now that you know the answer to your question of is signature forgery a crime and that forgery is a serious crime, you must react accordingly. Hire a lawyer you can trust who will support and defend you. Gounaris Abboud, LPA: Ready to Work on Your Case Gounaris Abboud, LPA, has more than 50 years of collective experience. Our firm provides high-quality, dedicated legal counsel to our clients. When you need outstanding criminal defense in Ohio, Gounaris Abboud, LPA, should be your first and only call. Call us now at 937-222-1515 or reach out online for a free case analysis.

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Probation Violation in Ohio

Choosing an Experienced Ohio Probation Defense Attorney Could Help You Achieve the Best Possible Outcome for Your Case Ohio courts refer to probation as “community control.” Community control means that a judge allowed you to live in the community after a conviction for a criminal offense instead of going to jail. Typically, the court will impose sanctions or restrictions on your liberty while you serve your time on probation. Failing to meet your conditions leads to severe probation violation consequences in Ohio. If you face a probation violation in Ohio, you should speak with a lawyer who has substantial experience defending probation violations. As we will explain, a judge has significant power over you while you are in a community control program. Aligning yourself with a law firm that has a reputation for fighting for its clients and winning the toughest fights might be your best chance to avoid incarceration. What Are the Possible Probation Violation Consequences in Ohio? Probation is a valuable tool in American courts. Not every offender deserves jail as punishment for every crime, and many people benefit from their time on community control. People get help to overcome the challenges that lead them into the criminal justice system with probation. Probation is essentially a contract. The terms of the agreement are simple: the judge promises not to put you in jail or prison if you abide by probation terms. Your probation ends when you complete the requirements the judge imposed or you violate your probation. What Does the Court Consider a Probation Violation in Ohio? Breaking any of the terms of your community control is a probation violation. Some people face probation violation consequences in Ohio because they did not complete a program or failed a drug test. Some courts refer to these violations as “technical violations.” Others have a probation violation in Ohio because they face new criminal charges. Your probation officer can ask for a warrant to arrest you if you violate probation. The judge may order you held in jail until the final probation hearing. You might not be able to post bond if the judge determines that is necessary. Three Possible Outcomes for an Ohio Probation Violation You have the right to a hearing before the judge revokes your probation. You can present evidence that could help you at the hearing, and you have the right to cross-examine witnesses. These valuable due process protections ensure that a court does not revoke your probation unlawfully. Having an aggressive Ohio probation violation defense lawyer will safeguard your rights to a fair hearing. After a hearing, the judge has three options: Enter a finding of “no violation”; Find you in violation of probation and reprobate or extend probation—sometimes judges will add more conditions to your community control; or Find you in violation of your probation, revoke your probation, and sentence you to prison or jail. The judge has broad discretion when it comes to probation violation hearings. You stand a better chance of convincing the judge that you should remain on probation instead of going to jail with a dedicated defense lawyer skilled in representing people with a probation violation in Ohio. How Can a Gounaris Abboud Criminal Defense Lawyer Help You Avoid Probation Violation Consequences in Ohio? Contact an Ohio probation violation defense lawyer from Gounaris Abboud as soon as you learn that you violated community control. You stand the best chance to correct the violation before landing in jail. Our firm will work with your probation officer to rectify any issues so that you can continue on your path to rehabilitation. If police allege you committed a new crime, we will aggressively fight the new case and your probation violation.  Contact Gounaris Abboud, LPA, today at 937-222-1515 to speak with our award-winning criminal defense attorneys recognized as Super Lawyers in Ohio for the last decade.  

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corruption-of-a-minor

Defending a Charge of Corruption of a Minor in Ohio Requires Representation from an Impassioned Ohio Criminal Defense Attorney You have options if police in Ohio charge you with the corruption of a minor. A conviction for corruption of a minor charge in Ohio could mean you face significant jail time, along with other life-altering consequences. Therefore, you need to contact an Ohio defense attorney who has the knowledge and skill to help you achieve the best result for your case. You deserve the best defense possible for your charges of corruption of a minor. Our team of tough, dependable, and aggressive criminal defense lawyers from Gounaris Abboud understands that you demand results. Our experienced criminal defense lawyers approach each case passionately. Call us today to preserve your future.  What Does Corruption of a Minor Mean? The Ohio Revised Code considers corruption of a minor a sex crime. The law states that a person who is 18 or older engaging in sexual conduct with a person between 13 and 16 years old is a crime, as long as the two people are unmarried.  The prosecution must prove that the accused knew, or acted recklessly in not knowing, that the victim’s age fell between 13 and 16 when the sexual conduct occurred. What Are the Potential Penalties for Corruption of a Minor in Ohio? The penalties for the corruption of a minor vary depending on the circumstances of the case.  The penalties range from a misdemeanor to a felony. If convicted of corruption of a minor, you face A first-degree misdemeanor if you and the alleged victim are less than four years apart; A fourth-degree felony if you are more than four years, but fewer than 10 years older than the alleged victim; A third-degree felony if you are more than 10 years older than the alleged victim; and A second-degree felony if you have a prior conviction for a corruption of a minor charge. You face up to 180 days in jail for a first-degree misdemeanor conviction. However, you could serve between two and eight years and pay a $15,000 fine for a second-degree felony conviction in Ohio. You need a criminal defense attorney with substantial experience by your side to achieve the best result for you if you face charges of corruption of a minor.  Collateral Consequences for Corruption of a Minor in Ohio Corruption of a minor is a sexually motivated crime in Ohio. The judge could sentence you to counseling designed to treat sex offenders. Also, the court will order you to register as a sex offender. Additionally, any conviction for a sex offense could have the consequence of deportation, exclusion from the U.S., or denial of your naturalization rights. You might also find it hard to land a good job with a sex crime on your record. And it may be difficult to locate adequate housing or apply for federal funding with a felony conviction on your record. Defending a Corruption of a Minor Charge Begins with a High-Quality Legal Team A criminal charge is simply an allegation of wrongdoing. You have rights that protect you. However, you must act swiftly to obtain the services of a dedicated attorney specializing in Ohio criminal defense.  Our award-winning criminal defense attorneys with Gounaris Abboud could give you the edge you need to walk away from a corruption of a minor charge. Call us today at 937-222-1515 to discuss your case with us. We are ready to fight to protect you and your future.

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murder-in-dayton-ohio-today

You Need Representation from an Experienced Murder Defense Lawyer Who Is Extremely Knowledgeable in the Law to Provide You with the Best Possible Defense If you are a suspect in a murder investigation or face murder charges in Dayton, Ohio, today, you and your family probably know how high the stakes are for you. No charge is more serious than murder. Accordingly, people convicted of murder face the stiffest penalties the criminal justice system in Ohio can impose. The police and prosecutors will stop at nothing to ensure they capture and convict the person who committed the crime. Their dedication to pursuing justice for the victim and the victim’s family means you need to have a lawyer who will do the same for you. Therefore, having a Dayton, Ohio murder defense lawyer with a wealth of experience defending serious criminal charges who also possesses an extraordinary knowledge of Ohio law on your side is necessary to ensure you receive the justice guaranteed to you by the Constitution. Murder Charges in Ohio Ohio law has created two categories of murder charges: aggravated murder and murder. You should understand the difference if you have charges of murder in Dayton, Ohio, today. What Is Murder Under Ohio Law? Murder is the unlawful killing of another or unlawful termination of another’s pregnancy. Ohio law also defines murder as causing the death of another person while committing a felony in the first or second degree, unless those felonies are voluntary or involuntary manslaughter.  A conviction or a guilty plea to murder carries a prison sentence between 15 years and life, along with a fine of no more than $15,000. Murder charges can be accompanied by enhanced charges such as: The victim was younger than 13;  The accused had a sexual motivation to commit the crime; or The accused is a sexually violent predator and had a sexual motivation to commit the crime. Murder charges under these circumstances allow the judge to sentence the offender to 30 years to life, or life without parole, depending on the case. What Is Aggravated Murder According to Ohio Law? Aggravated murder in Ohio is the purposeful killing of another or unlawful termination of a pregnancy with “prior calculation and design.” The mental element of the charge is often referred to as “malice aforethought.” Examples of killing with prior calculation and design are lying in wait to kill, poisoning, or drowning the victim.  Ohio law punishes several other killings as aggravated murder as well. A person could face aggravated murder charges for: Purposely killing another while committing, attempting to commit, or fleeing from kidnapping, rape, arson, aggravated arson, robbery, aggravated robbery, burglary, aggravated burglary, trespass in a home when someone is there, escape, or terrorism; Purposely killing a person younger than 13; Intentionally causing the death of another after escaping detention following the conviction of a felony;  Intentionally killing a law enforcement officer or killing a law enforcement officer in the line of duty; or Purposely killing a military member or first responder because the victim was a first responder or in the military. A person convicted of aggravated murder in Ohio faces the death penalty or life in prison without parole. The court could assess a fine not to exceed $25,000 as well. What Could a Dayton, Ohio Murder Defense Attorney Do For You? You need a dedicated advocate who will strive to find justice if you face charges alleging murder in Dayton, Ohio. Having the overworked public defender in your corner means you are just another file. However, with an experienced Dayton, Ohio murder defense lawyer fighting for you, you will have a zealous advocate who will: Prioritize your case; Examine every piece of evidence closely; Investigate third-party culprits, find independent witnesses, and look for ways to discredit the state’s witnesses; and Argue the best defenses to win your case or weaken the state’s case so that you receive a reduced charge. The potential defenses an experienced Dayton, Ohio criminal defense lawyer could use depends on the circumstances of each case. Experience the Difference Aggressive Representation Could Make for You Our dedicated and experienced murder defense attorneys with Gounaris Abboud, LPA, have distinguished themselves throughout their careers. Our murder defense team includes an acting judge, former magistrate, and former prosecutor. We are aggressive advocates for our clients facing capital crimes like murder. Guided by our extensive experience, our team will assemble the best defense possible guaranteed by the Constitution. Call our office today at 937-222-1515 or visit our website to learn how we could help you defend your charges of murder in Dayton, Ohio.

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porn laws ohio

The United States Constitution and Ohio laws provide citizens with a great deal of freedom and privacy. However, all these rights are tempered by restrictions aimed to protect minors from abuse and exploitation. As a result, there are pornography laws. Let’s take a look at Ohio laws of pornography to better understand these restrictions. Is Watching Porn Illegal in Ohio Always? Pornography, otherwise known as porn, generally involves viewing sexual acts for sexual pleasure.  Watching pornography is not always illegal. In fact, Ohio recognizes that adults have the right to view pornographic images and in many ways does not interfere with this right. However, there are some restrictions. When law enforcement believes that a person violated the Ohio pornography laws, they will arrest them, the government will prosecute them, and the accused will need our veteran criminal defense firm.  What Types of Pornography Do Ohio Porn Laws Restrict? In an effort to protect children from abuse and exploitation, Ohio pornography laws heavily address child pornography. The Ohio Laws and Administrative Rules make it illegal to:   Produce,  Transport, Share,  Receive, or  Possess (view, own) child pornography.  Under Ohio laws of pornography, a child or minor is anyone under 18 years of age. It is important to note that viewing child pornography includes watching it in person, through the internet, on mobile devices, and via hard copy pictures. If you are concerned about whether something you have viewed is illegal, it is important to contact our criminal defense firm. We have sex crime experience and understand how Ohio courts have interpreted the Ohio porn laws. Our attorneys can discuss the specifics of your individual situation. If the criminal defense is needed, we will work to get you the best result possible. Is Violating Pornography Laws a Serious Offense? Violation of Ohio porn laws can result in a felony conviction and a mandatory registration as a sex offender. Images of child pornography are not considered protected speech by the Constitution. In addition, child pornography is an offense for which there is strict liability, meaning that it is irrelevant whether the watcher knew the person they were viewing was a minor.  Therefore, when faced with any type of crime that has even a tenuous connection to child pornography, it is critical that the accused hire an exceptional child pornography lawyer. At Gounaris Abboud, our attorneys are not here to judge. Instead, they will work hard to defend you and protect your rights.   Gounaris Abboud, LPA: A Leading Ohio Criminal Defense Firm Our firm is led by award-winning criminal defense attorneys. We take pride in the fact that we consistently provide top-notch representation and leave our clients highly satisfied with our service. To speak to an attorney for a free, no-obligation consultation, please contact us online or by calling 937-222-1515. Our goal is to protect you, and we are prepared to handle cases in Dayton and throughout Ohio. Don’t wait—get in touch with our legal team now.

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breaking and entering in ohio

What You Need to Know If You Face a Charge of Breaking and Entering in Ohio Breaking and entering is a serious offense in Ohio. Police and prosecutors push hard to impose significant jail time for breaking and entering. Therefore, you need a tough and dedicated criminal defense lawyer to defend you against breaking and entering charge. What Is Breaking and Entering? Under the Ohio Revised Code, breaking and entering is a fifth-degree felony. The charge of breaking and entering in Ohio relates to two criminal acts combined into one offense: trespass and theft.  The statute prohibits any person from using force, stealth, or deception to trespass in an unoccupied structure. Additionally, a conviction for breaking and entering requires proof of an intent to commit a theft offense or any felony.  An experienced breaking and entering defense lawyer will explain to you that the Ohio Revised Codebreaking and entering law uses words that have particular meanings. Under this law, trespass means to enter or remain in any structure without permission. “Structure” is a term that refers to any building, car, truck, mobile home, outbuilding, shed, trailer, or dwelling. The word force means using any physical effort to gain entry. Meanwhile, stealth means trying to avoid discovery when entering. Lastly, deception involves a person trying to trick someone into allowing them to enter the structure.  Additionally, the police may bring a breaking and entering charge in Ohio when a person enters on the land or premises of another with the intent to commit any felony.  What Is the Possible Jail Time for Breaking and Entering? Any person convicted of a fifth-degree felony in Ohio faces a maximum term of one year in prison, with a minimum of six months in prison. The court may impose a fine of up to $2,500. The judge may also impose restitution during a term of probation. How Is Breaking and Entering in Ohio Different from Burglary? In Ohio, a burglary occurs when a person enters a home or structure and remains in the structure with an intent to commit a crime.  The severity of the crime increases if a person is in the dwelling or is likely to be within the dwelling. Additionally, the penalties for burglary increase when a person enters the building while armed.  A person convicted of burglary in Ohio could face up to a first-degree felony. Defenses for a Breaking and Entering Charge in Ohio Police and prosecutors will use all their resources to prove the case. However, proving a breaking and entering charge is difficult without solid eyewitness testimony or forensic evidence.  A seasoned criminal defense lawyer will develop a successful defense strategy after thoroughly reviewing all the evidence. However, an experienced criminal trial attorney understands how to attack eyewitness testimony and discredit forensic evidence to help protect your freedom. Fight Your Breaking and Entering Charge with the Help of Dedicated Criminal Lawyers If you face a charge of breaking and entering in Ohio, you need a tough defense team to stand by you and protect your rights. The award-winning criminal defense attorneys with Gounaris Abboud have the skill, knowledge, and dedication your case deserves. Call our criminal defense lawyers today for help with your breaking and entering charge at 937-222-1515 or contact us online.

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