assault in ohio

Battery VS Assault: What Is The Difference Between Assault And Battery In the state of Ohio, assault and battery are two separate offenses that oftentimes go hand in hand. Ohio assault laws defines assault as the act of causing or attempting to cause harm to another person or unborn child, while battery involves negligently or intentionally causing bodily harm or offensive physical contact. Assault can either be considered simple, negligent or aggravated. While simple and negligent assault are charged as misdemeanors, aggravated assault can be a felony offense if committed against a protected party such as a police officer, firefighter, teacher, or another public servant. Related: How to Defend Against Assault Charges Ohio Assault Laws – Types Of Assault Charges in Ohio Simple Assault Simple assault, oftentimes plainly referred to as just “assault,” is a first-degree misdemeanor offense in Ohio and can carry penalties up to six months in jail and $1,000 in fines. Simple assault involves knowingly or recklessly causing harm to another person or their unborn child. Under this definition, a person does not need to have the intent to harm in order to be found guilty. Negligent Assault A person can be charged with negligent assault In the event that a person should cause physical harm to another person through the negligent handling of a deadly weapon. Negligent assault is a third-degree misdemeanor, carrying up to 60 days in jail and fines up to $500. Negligent assault is oftentimes charged in relation to hunting accidents or accidental shootings. Felony Assault In serious cases where a person causes or attempts to harm another person with the use of a deadly weapon or firearm, they may be charged with felony assault – the most serious type of assault. Felony assault in Ohio can carry the following consequences: For a first degree felony, up to eleven years in prison and fines up to $20,000. For a first degree felony committed against a police officer, up to eleven years in prison, fines up to $20,000, and a mandatory minimum sentence of at least three years in prison. For a second degree felony, up to eight years in prison and fines up to $15,000. Similarly, aggravated assault is charged when a person commits an assault in a fit of rage after being provoked by the victim. Aggravated assault is often charged as a fourth degree felony, though it can be escalated to a second-degree felony if committed against a police officer. A conviction of aggravated assault can carry up to six years in prison and $5,000 in fines. Is Pushing Someone Assault In Ohio? Pushing in associated with assault can vary from state to state. Some states consider physical attack an assault, which would include slapping or even slightly pushing or shoving another person. This could be regarded as a simple assault. Other states consider assault to be any sort of action that threatens another person, such as threatening to push or punch someone. Under Ohio assault laws, pushing or shoving someone would be considered a simple assault. Related: Case Results: Assault and Domestic Violence Charges Dismissed Charged with Assault? Contact Us If you have been accused of any type of assault, a skilled Dayton criminal defense attorney from Gounaris Abboud, LPA, can protect your rights in court and provide the aggressive defense you need during this time. Having earned an Ohio Super Lawyers® inclusion and a ranking on The National Trial Lawyers: Top 100 list for our excellence, we have what it takes to fight and win on your behalf. Find out more about what our award-winning lawyers can do for you during a free consultation.

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In recent months, and even in recent years, there has been much media attention on gun laws all across the country. Despite the news feeds and stories about firearms, their responsible handling, and their potential dangers, clarity on actual gun laws is difficult to find. In order to help our clients make sense of pertinent firearm laws and any weapons charges they might be facing, our Dayton criminal defense attorneys at Gounaris Abboud have compiled some of the basic information that should be known by everyone in Ohio here in this blog. Please give it a read if you want to know Ohio State’s gun possession, permit, and carry laws. If you need legal representation, you are encouraged to contact us without delay to set up your free case evaluation as soon as possible. Ohio Gun Laws 101 Ohio State legislation currently (circa March 2016) does not require a permit to purchase a rifle, shotgun, or handgun, nor does it require mandatory registration for any such firearm. Owners also do not require licensing, and only handguns require a permit to carry openly in public. If you want to carry a concealed weapon of any kind, either on your person or in your automobile, you will need a specific concealed weapon permit. In order to qualify for a concealed weapon permit, you must be: 21 years of age or older. A legal United States resident. Live in Ohio State for at least 45 days. Live in your specific Ohio State county for at least 30 days. Able to complete a firearm safety and training course. Able to prove you read a firearms safety manual provided by local sheriff departments. In order to be eligible for your concealed weapon permit, you must also not be: A fugitive of the law. Convicted of or facing felony charges. Convicted of or facing misdemeanor charges involving violence or drugs. Convicted of resisting arrest within the last 10 years. Considered mentally dangerous. Subject to a current order of protection or restraint. Ohio State will also recognize an official concealed carry license or permit from any other state in the union. If you are convicted of carrying a concealed firearm with no valid permit, you could face: $1,000 fine Six months in jail Firearm safety retraining If you still have questions about firearm laws in Ohio, or if need help with a legal issue relevant to a weapon you own or control, call 937-222-1515 to connect with our Dayton weapons charges lawyers.

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weapons crime conviction

In some cases, a criminal case can cost a hardworking employee his or her job. That was what almost happened to a defendant who came to Gounaris Abboud, LPA after being charged with Carrying a Concealed Weapon and Having a Firearm While Intoxicated. Both of these crimes carry serious punishments, but for this specific individual there was more at stake than a few years in jail. At the time of the crime, this employee faced certain unemployment if convicted. He is a veteran of the Air Force and has a top-secret security clearance. When he merited his charges, he was working as a civilian contractor at the Patterson Air Force Base. His income was helping him to pay the mortgage on his home in the Dayton suburb of Springboro. When an individual has a top security clearance like this client, it is imperative that that person stays out of trouble. Any criminal convictions lead to almost certain termination from the defendant’s place of employment. This is why this client had to get the best of the best to represent him in his case. He came to Gounaris Abboud, LPA and was partnered with an attorney at our firm. We were able to help him work through the details of his case and eventually create a defense strategy that was convincing. With aggressive representation from our firm, this client was able to keep his job, his home, and his security clearance. Had he been proven guilty of his crime, he would have lost all of these priviledges. We were able to get this man’s charges dismissed. They were replaced with a misdemeanor disorderly conduct charge. The defendant’s only punishment was that he had to forfeit the firearm that had caused so much trouble and he plead guilty to the disorderly conduct charge. Because this charge is minimal, our client should have no problem obtaining his security clearance again when it comes time to renew it next year. If you have been charged with a weapons crime and are currently trying to work through your situation, hire a Dayton criminal defense lawyer that you can trust to be there for you.

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