mail theft punishment

Shoplifting crimes may seem like minor offenses. However, the shoplifting laws in Ohio fall under the general category of theft. Since theft crimes can either be misdemeanors or felonies, you should be aware of the negative consequences a theft conviction could have on your life. Having a dedicated and experienced Ohio criminal defense lawyer by your side can help you resolve your case favorably. The Dayton criminal defense lawyers with Gounaris Abboud, LPA, do more than aggressively defend your case. When you work with our firm, you will experience the difference a trustworthy, empathetic, honest, and supportive attorney can make in your life.  Shoplifting Charges in Ohio Shoplifting in Ohio has two meanings. You might think that shoplifting only takes place when someone conceals an item and walks out of a store without paying. However, deceiving the store owner to pay less for an item is also shoplifting. You might not realize it, but changing the price on an item by either altering the price tag or by switching the price tag from one item to another is shoplifting. That’s harder to do these days when most stores don’t use price tags and rely on UPC barcodes for pricing. But switching packaging is also shoplifting when you pay less for the item than indicated for that specific item.  Ohio Shoplifting Penalties  Shoplifting penalties range in severity depending on the value of the stolen items. Although the term shoplifting implies that the stolen items are small and easily concealed, the theft statute in Ohio allows someone to serve up to 10 years in prison, depending on the situation.  Under the Ohio theft law, a conviction for stealing property valued at less than $1,000 is petty theft and is a first-degree misdemeanor. The maximum penalty for a first-degree misdemeanor is 180 days in jail and a maximum fine of $1,000. The punishments become more serious as the value of the stolen property increases. Stolen merchandise valued between $1,000 and $7,500 constitutes a fifth-degree felony. You could serve between six months to one year in jail and have to pay a $2,500 fine.  Stealing property valued between $7,500 and $150,000 is a fourth-degree felony. The punishment ranges from 6 to 18 months in jail and a $5,000 fine. You face third-degree felony charges for theft of property worth $150,000 up to $750,000. The punishment for this charge is a prison sentence of one to five years and a fine of no more than $10,000. Second-degree felony theft is the appropriate charge for property stolen that has a value of at least $750,000 but less than $1,500,000. The prison term for this sentence falls between two and eight years, along with a fine of $15,000.  Stealing property worth more than $1,500,000 is a first-degree felony. The sentence for this offense is 3 to 10 years in prison and a $20,000 fine. Additional Shoplifting Penalties You could face civil liability for shoplifting in addition to criminal sanctions. As a result, the judge may order you to make restitution to the store owner for the value of the goods stolen. Also, you are liable for any damages the store incurred beyond the value of the stolen property. For instance, the court could find that you damaged property while fleeing the store. If so, the judge may order you to pay for those losses as well. You should understand that civil liability could entail paying the plaintiff’s attorney’s fees and court costs as well. A felony conviction carries collateral consequences on top of the penalties described above. A felony conviction for theft could be impossible to seal or expunge from your record. You might also have a difficult time finding work or keeping your job if your employer considers theft to be a crime of dishonesty. A theft conviction may hamper your pursuit of educational opportunities as well. A felony theft conviction could endanger your immigration status if you are not a U.S. citizen. Additionally, you could lose your ability to become a naturalized citizen or be refused re-entry into the country. You could also lose the right to vote and your right to possess a firearm.  Why Do I Need a Lawyer for My Shoplifting Charge? The shoplifting laws in Ohio are strict. You could go to jail even after a conviction for petty theft. Moreover, as the value of the stolen property increases, so does the likelihood that you will go to prison. Having a skilled Ohio criminal defense attorney fight for you can protect your rights. You have only one chance to defend your case successfully. Making a mistake while trying to defend yourself—even from misdemeanor shoplifting charges—can hurt you in the long run. Seeking advice from a skilled attorney with extensive experience defending the rights of the accused gives you the best chance to minimize the impact your charges will have on your life. Work with a Dayton Law Firm That Cares About Your Future Call Gounaris Abboud, LPA, today at 937-222-1515 or contact us online to speak with one of our experienced and compassionate criminal defense lawyers. Our award-winning attorneys will explain your options and plot a course of action that can help you get the best results for the circumstances surrounding your case. We may be able to get the prosecutor to agree to a favorable plea, reduce your charges, or possibly even dismiss your case altogether. With our extensive legal knowledge and dedication to your well-being, we can make a difference for you. 

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Aggravated Burglary Ohio

Someone can be guilty of both burglary and robbery or of either crime separately. Although many consider both burglary and robbery to be synonymous with theft, they are distinct crimes that involve circumstances beyond basic theft. Burglary always involves trespass but does not always involve stealing something. Robbery is a theft that involves some type of threat, force, or use of a weapon.  Theft Offenses in Ohio Ohio divides theft offenses into petty theft and grand theft, depending on the value of the property stolen. Someone commits theft when they unlawfully take goods or services from another person without consent or beyond the limits of consent with the intent to permanently deprive the person of the property. If the value of the goods or services is under $1,000, it is petty theft, a first-degree misdemeanor. If the value is over $1,000 or is a credit card, check, license plate, or DMV form for title or registration, it is a felony. The level of felony increases based upon the alleged loss.   What Is Burglary? Burglary is also called “breaking and entering.” Someone commits burglary when they unlawfully trespass in any part of a non-abandoned building or structure with the intent to commit a crime. This could be a theft crime or another type of crime, such as an assault. It is a third-degree felony. Burglary is a second-degree felony when someone else is present in the building or if the building is someone’s temporary or permanent dwelling. Merely trespassing unlawfully in someone’s permanent or temporary habitation, without the intent to commit a crime, is a fourth-degree felony. Burglary can occur in any type of non-abandoned structure, e.g., a building, a boat, an airplane, or a vehicle. Examples of someone’s dwelling or habitation would be the person’s house or apartment, a hotel room, or a tent.   What Is Aggravated Burglary? Someone commits aggravated burglary when they commit burglary when they either harm or threaten to harm someone else or have a deadly weapon. Aggravated burglary is a first-degree felony.  What Is Robbery? Someone commits robbery when they attempt or commit theft, or they are fleeing after doing so, and they: Have a deadly weapon, Harm or attempt to harm someone else, or  Use or threaten force against someone.  Robbery is a felony. It is a second-degree felony if the person had a deadly weapon or it involved physical harm to another person. It is a third-degree felony if it involved only force or the threat of force. What Is Aggravated Robbery?  Aggravated robbery is when someone attempts or commits theft, or is fleeing afterward, and they: Have a deadly weapon and make it known by showing it, using it, or indicating that they have it; or Seriously harm or attempt to seriously harm someone else. Penalties Penalties for burglary or robbery depend on the degree of the felony charge. All convictions will involve prison time and a fine. The court may also suspend or limit driving privileges in certain circumstances.  First-degree felony: three to ten years prison and a $20,000 maximum fine; Second-degree felony: two to eight years prison and a $10,000 maximum fine; Third-degree felony: one to five years prison and a $10,000 maximum fine; Fourth-degree felony: six to 18 months prison and a $5,000 maximum fine; and Fifth-degree felony: six to 12 months prison and a $2,500 maximum fine. Aggravating factors that would increase the penalty include theft of a: Firearm or deadly weapon, Motor vehicle, Dangerous drug, Police animal or support animal, Gasoline, or  Rented property or services. For the crime of burglary involving physical harm to another person, the seriousness of the harm is an aggravating factor. Gounaris Abboud, LPA, Has the Criminal Defense Attorneys You Need Our attorneys at Gounaris Abboud, LPA, have more than 50 years of experience between them, and we take bold, zealous approaches to legal defense. Our theft crimes defense attorneys can help you understand what to expect from the legal system and devise a defense that suits your best interests. Please contact us via our website or call 937-222-1515 to schedule your consultation. 

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Ohio Theft Laws

Your Questions About Ohio Theft Laws Answered Ohio theft law involves two general questions: Has a theft occurred, and if so, what penalty might apply? Because theft is a crime in Ohio, committing theft can lead to criminal penalties. These can include a fine, jail or prison time, or both. If you are facing a theft charge in Ohio, an experieced theft crime lawyer at Gounaris Abboud, LPA can help you understand the charges against you, potential penalties, and defense strategies. Why Choose Our Theft Crime Lawyers? Former prosecutors and former judge on our defense team Perfect 10.0 Superb Ratings by Avvo Inclusion in Ohio Super Lawyers® The National Trial Lawyers: Top 100 Trial Lawyers OHIO THEFT LAWS FAQ Did a Theft Crime Occur Under Ohio Theft Laws? First, it is important to understand what conduct is considered theft under Ohio’s theft law. Ohio theft law makes it a crime to knowingly obtain or exert control over another person’s property or services by unlawful means. Taking another’s property is unlawful when it is: Without the owner’s consent; Beyond the scope of the owner’s permission; By deception; By threat; or By intimidation Also, the Ohio theft law requires that the person take the property or service with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of that property or service. For example, it is not theft to take another person’s bicycle without their permission if you intend to return it after a short ride around the block. It is theft, however, to take the bike intending to ride off and never return. If a person unlawfully takes the property of another with the intent to deprive the owner of that property permanently, then that person committed a theft. OHIO THEFT LAWS FAQ What Criminal Penalties Apply Under Ohio Theft Laws? If a theft occurred, the next question to ask is, what penalties might apply upon conviction? The penalties that apply depend on the seriousness of the theft. The least serious class of theft is petty theft which is classified as a misdemeanor. More serious theft offenses are felony offenses. Ohio’s theft laws classify theft as petty theft or felony theft based on the value of the property or services stolen. The type of property can also determine the class of the offense. Ohio’s theft laws supply criminal penalties for each type of petty and felony theft offense. In general, the more serious the theft offense, the more severe the penalty. PETTY THEFT OHIO FAQ Ohio Petty Theft Laws Ohio theft laws outline when theft qualifies as petty theft. Petty theft occurs when the value of the property stolen is less than $1,000. Ohio petty theft laws make petty theft a misdemeanor offense. Petty theft in Ohio is punishable by a maximum fine of $1,000 and up to 180 days in jail.  FELONY THEFT OHIO FAQ Ohio Felony Theft Laws In Ohio, theft is a felony if the value of the property stolen is more than $1,000. Felony theft can be in the first, second, third, fourth, or fifth degree. The least severe penalties apply to fifth-degree felony theft, which is the least serious type of felony theft offense. First-degree felony theft is the most serious type of theft offense, and it carries the most severe punishment. Fifth-Degree Felony Theft Theft is a fifth-degree felony when the value of the stolen property or services is between $1,000 and $7,500. Theft is also a fifth-degree felony when the property taken is: A negotiable instrument, such as a credit card, debit card, or check, or A vehicle license plate or temporary placard, a blank vehicle title form, or a blank driver’s license form. Fifth-degree felony theft is punishable by a fine up to $2,500 and a prison sentence between six and 12 months. Fourth-Degree Felony Theft (Grand Theft) What is the penalty for grand theft in Ohio? Theft is a fourth-degree felony, also called grand theft, when the value of the property or services have taken between $7,500 and $150,000. Grand theft also results when the stolen property is a: Motor vehicle or Dangerous drug The penalty for grand theft includes a fine of up to $5,000 and a prison sentence between six and 18 months. Third-Degree Felony Theft (Aggravated Theft) Third-degree felony theft is theft of property that is worth more than $150,000 but less than $750,000. The theft is also a third-degree felony offense when the property was stolen is a: Firearm or Anhydrous ammonia. Penalties for third-degree felony theft include a maximum fine of $10,000 and between one and five years in prison. Second-Degree Felony Theft (Aggravated Theft) Second-degree felony theft results when the value of the stolen property is between $750,000 and $1,500,000. Felony theft in the second degree is punishable by a fine up to $15,000 and a minimum prison sentence between two and eight years. First-Degree Felony Theft (Aggravated Theft) When property or services have taken are worth more than $1,500,000, the theft is a first-degree felony. Criminal penalties for felony theft of the first degree include a fine up to $20,000 and a minimum prison sentence between three and 11 years. OHIO THEFT LAW FAQ Facing Theft Charges in Ohio? Contact a Defense Lawyer at Gounaris Abboud, LPA If you are facing a theft crime charge, your next step is to seek help from an experienced theft crimes attorney. At Gounaris Abboud, LPA, our job is to protect your rights. The theft crimes defense lawyers at Gounaris Abboud can help you understand the charges you face and explain how to present your best defense. To learn more about how the defense lawyers at Gounaris Abboud, LPA, can protect you, contact our office today at (937) 222-1515 to schedule a free initial case evaluation.

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theft crimes

At Gounaris Abboud, LPA, the attorneys are constantly working to benefit defendants and represent them to the best of their ability. Recently, a defendant’s family abandoned their original criminal defense attorney and hired our firm to tackle their case. At the time that we approached the case, the defendant was already in prison serving a two-year sentence that was a plea bargain from his theft charges trial. The defendant was charged with stealing over $150,000 from multiple businesses that he was associated with. In order to receive a lesser sentence, the defendant pled guilty to a number of felony theft offenses. Now, he has a felony on his record. As a recent college graduate, this could heavily influence his ability to make a successful career in the future. After the plea bargain was struck in court, the defendant’s family contacted us. We were asked to review the case and try to get the defendant out of prison before his two-year sentence was up. We were able to successfully get the individual out of prison on early release, and are not working to appeal an underlying conviction and the amount of restitution that the court has ordered him to pay. If we are able to successfully appeal the conviction, then the felony will be taken off of the defendant’s record, giving him the opportunity to pursue a professional career once again. So far, this client is thrilled with the results that Gounaris Abboud, LPA has been able to provide. If you have been charged with a white collar crime or a theft crime, don’t hire an attorney who won’t go the extra mile. This defendant was dissatisfied with his first attorney, but is now happy and feels taken care of as he works with our professional defense team. Talk to a Dayton criminal defense lawyer at the firm today!

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