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Trustworthy. Empathetic. Honest. Supportive.

Hear what else our clients are saying about us.

  • I found Gounaris and Abboud through good online reviews. Mr. Abboud handled my cases very professionally for two years. He truly takes his cases to heart and cares about his clients. He keeps you informed and has all the answers to all your questions. You really feel safe with Mr. Abboud as your lawyer. I would highly recommend him to anyone needing professional family law representation.

    Patty M.
  • Attorney Nick Gounaris handled my case and he did a wonderful job. I am very pleased with this law firm. I have never been in the situation I found myself in ever before and it was scary and confusing, but Nick and his staff were wonderful with answering my many questions and they were very sympathetic and understanding, always quick to respond when I would call. I am happy with the outcome of my case. If you find yourself in a situation that needs legal help, these are the guys to call!

    Melinda Q.
  • They did absolutely everything possible to help reduce the sentence and charges faced. The fees for their services were worth every cent and superior to any public defendant representation. They both put their hearts into their work and care like nobody else I have ever encountered in the legal system.

    Karis F.

A crime, an accusal, or a DUI
can change your life.

When facing high-stakes legal situations like these, it’s comforting to know that you can trust the team representing you. Nick Gounaris has been included in the list of Super Lawyers® in the field of criminal defense for a number of years. Similarly, Tony Abboud has received a 10.0 “Superb” rating by Avvo and has been included in the Ohio Super Lawyers® list for a number of years.

As a top criminal lawyer in Dayton, our award-winning criminal attorneys are available 24/7, and we only stop when we achieve the best possible results for you and your loved ones.

We will fight to get you the best possible outcome, reduce or dismiss charges & keep you out of jail. If you are facing any criminal charges, DUI, federal crime, personal injury, or need a family law attorney, we can help you. We know what to look for in Police and FBI reports when building your defense. Working in Ohio and Federal courts, we offer the experience to handle any legal challenge with personal attention and service.

Recognized by Super Lawyers, Avvo, Ohio State Bar Association, the Federal Bar Association, and The National Trial Lawyers Top 100, the criminal defense attorneys at Gounaris Abboud have extensive trial experience and ensure our clients are vigorously advocated for.

Our criminal defense lawyers are always ready to provide clients with aggressive and reliable representation throughout Dayton, OH. Our criminal lawyers in Dayton always have your best interest in the front of our minds and provide legal representation to provide the best possible outcome for your case.

Contact a Dayton criminal defense attorney to get started working on your case.

Let’s get to work on your case.
About Our Firm

Dayton Criminal Lawyers With Extensive Legal knowledge

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What Are the Laws and Penalties for Embezzlement in Ohio?

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Embezzlement is one of the most commonly prosecuted white-collar crimes in America’s state and federal courts. However, the laws surrounding embezzlement are complex, and those who face these serious charges often lack a full understanding of how they allegedly broke the law. At Gounaris Abboud, LPA, our dedicated team of white-collar criminal defense attorneys has a long history of successfully defending clients facing embezzlement charges in Ohio. We can help you identify the best possible defense and effectively present it to the judge or jury. Contact us today to get started.  What Is Embezzlement? Many who face embezzlement charges wonder, What is embezzlement? Essentially, embezzlement is a property crime involving a breach of trust. It happens when a person has lawful control over someone else’s assets, but they don’t own those assets. If they convert those assets over to themselves for their own enrichment, they have likely embezzled the assets. A common example would be employee theft. Under Ohio embezzlement laws, someone commits this offense if they have possession or control over someone else’s property or money, and they use it for their own enrichment in any of the following ways: Without the consent of the property’s owner; Beyond the scope under which they are authorized to act; By deception; By threat; or By intimidation. Embezzlement is a type of theft crime. Thus, the punishment for embezzlement depends, in part, on the value of the property at issue. Is Embezzlement a Felony? Depending on the circumstances, embezzlement is either a misdemeanor or felony offense. Under Ohio Revised Code § 2913.02, if the amount embezzled is less than $1,000, the offense is a first-degree misdemeanor. However, the seriousness of an embezzlement offense increases along with the value of the alleged property. $1,000 to $7,499—Fifth-degree felony $7,500 to $149,999—Fourth-degree felony $150,000 to $749,999—Third-degree felony $750,000 to $1,499,999—Second-degree felony More than $1.5 million—First-degree felony Protected Class In addition, an embezzlement offense committed against a protected class of people becomes a more serious crime. Under Ohio embezzlement laws, the following are protected classes: Elderly people; Disabled adults; and Active-duty service members and their spouses. An embezzlement offense against a protected class is at least a felony of the fifth degree. $1,000 to $7,499—Fourth-degree felony $7,500 to $37,499—Third-degree felony $37,500 to $149,999—Second-degree felony More than $150,000—First-degree felony Other Factors in Seriousness Level There are also other situations in which embezzlement penalties become more serious. For example, Embezzlement of a firearm is considered a felony of the third degree; Embezzlement of a motor vehicle is a felony of the fourth degree; Embezzlement of a dangerous drug is a felony of the fourth degree unless you have a prior conviction for a drug offense, in which case it is a felony of the third degree; and Embezzlement of a police dog or horse is a felony of the third degree. The seriousness levels for embezzlement can be confusing. So it is best to consult with an experienced Ohio criminal defense attorney to better understand the allegations against you and the possible punishments you face. Punishments for Embezzlement Ohio law provides for ranges of punishment based on the seriousness of the offense. Below is a list of the various penalties an embezzlement conviction may carry: First-degree felony: 3 to 11 years in prison, plus a fine of up to $20,000; Second-degree felony: 2 to 8 years in prison, plus a fine of up to $15,000; Third-degree felony: 9 to 36 months in prison, plus a fine of up to $10,000; Fourth-degree felony: 6 to 18 months in prison, plus a fine of up to $5,000; and Fifth-degree felony: 6 to 12 months in prison, plus a fine of up to $2,500. In most cases, a judge has the discretion to sentence a defendant to probation; however, this is not a guarantee. Typically, judges are more likely to consider probation in lieu of incarceration for those who express remorse for their actions, have a verifiable employment history, and are able to present other mitigating evidence showing that incarceration is not appropriate. Do You Face Embezzlement Charges in Ohio? If you or a loved one faces embezzlement charges in Ohio, it is essential that you work with an attorney who has experience handling these complex cases. At Gounaris Abboud, LPA, our dedicated team of defense lawyers has decades of experience litigating a wide range of white-collar crimes, including embezzlement offenses. As skilled negotiators, we are often able to resolve cases favorably without the need for a trial. However, we are also seasoned litigators—meaning we will not hesitate to take your case to trial in front of the judge or jury if the prosecution isn’t willing to fairly resolve the case. We also make ourselves available 24/7 to answer your questions or discuss your case. To learn more and to schedule, a free consultation with a Dayton, Ohio criminal defense lawyer, call us at 937-222-1515. You can also reach us through our online contact form.

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What Is the Difference Between State and Federal White-Collar Crimes?

| Read Time: 4 minutes

If you face charges for a white-collar crime, it is important you understand exactly what is at stake. While most white-collar crimes are non-violent in nature, that doesn’t mean that they are not taken seriously. In many cases, those convicted of a white-collar crime face the possibility of a jail sentence. There are many types of white-collar crimes, many of which can be prosecuted under state or federal law. In this article, the Dayton, Ohio criminal defense lawyers at Gounaris Abboud, LPA will go over the ins and outs of white-collar crimes. If you have questions, please contact us today,  What Are White-Collar Crimes? A white-collar crimes definition isn’t exact. But generally speaking, the term white-collar crime is used to refer to non-violent financial crimes. The name comes from the fact that, often, those accused of a white-collar crime are executives or high-ranking “white-collar” workers. There are many types of white-collar crimes, including the following. Embezzlement Embezzlement is when someone misappropriates money or other property that was entrusted to that person. For example, a stockbroker who uses her clients’ money for personal purposes may be committing embezzlement. Insurance Fraud Insurance fraud involves making a false claim with an insurance company or providing false information. For example, a doctor who files a claim with an insurance company for a treatment she never provided may be committing insurance fraud. Money Laundering Money laundering involves taking illegally obtained money and making it appear as though it came from a legitimate source. Often, money laundering involves “washing” the money through a cash-heavy business. Investment Fraud Investment fraud describes a broad range of white-collar crimes, all of which are intended to bilk investors from their money. For example, pyramid schemes, Ponzi schemes, advance-fee fraud, and cryptocurrency fraud are all types of investment fraud. These are just a few of the different white-collar crimes; there are many more. However, as a general rule, a white-collar crime involves a professional person using false or misleading statements to gain access to another’s money or property. It is very important to understand the type of white-collar crime you face. It is also essential you understand the difference between state and federal white-collar crimes. Are White-Collar Crimes State of Federal Offenses? Many types of white-collar crime can be charged in state or federal court. As a general rule, if your conduct allegedly violates state law, state prosecutors will charge you in state court. However, if your conduct involves an alleged violation of federal law, federal prosecutors will likely charge you in federal court. In many criminal cases, state and federal prosecutors both have the ability to charge a defendant’s conduct. This happens when a defendant’s actions allegedly violate both state and federal law. However, state courts handle the vast majority of criminal offenses. That said, white-collar crime ends up in federal court more often than many other types of crime. There are a few reasons for this. Complexity White-collar criminal prosecutions often involve complex financial schemes. It can be very expensive and labor-intensive to investigate these offenses. The federal government has far more resources than the state government. Thus, the federal government may pick up a case if it believes the state government lacks the resources to mount an effective prosecution. Additionally, if a case involves an investigation that spans multiple states, it may be more difficult for a single state prosecutor’s office to bring the charges. Interstate Activity The United States Constitution places limits on the types of cases that federal courts can hear. One of the categories of cases that fall within a federal court’s jurisdiction is those involving actions committed in more than one state. Many white-collar crimes involve interstate commerce. For example, using the internet, phone lines, or the mail can trigger federal court jurisdiction. Notoriety Federal prosecutors are more selective in choosing their cases because there are fewer federal prosecutors than their state counterparts. However, the federal government tends to focus on those cases that are note-worthy or have very high stakes. Knowing whether you face white-collar state crimes or federal white-collar crimes is important. It can determine your best defense strategy as well as the punishment you face if convicted. Thus, it is essential you work with an attorney who is experienced in handling state and federal white-collar crimes. Are You Facing a White-Collar Criminal Prosecution? If you face white-collar crimes in state or federal court, it is imperative that you reach out to a dedicated criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. At Gounaris Abboud, LPA, our attorneys handle all types of criminal offenses, including white-collar crimes, theft offenses, drug crimes, and more. We routinely handle cases in both state and federal court and work with our clients to develop compelling defenses to the charges they face. We also make ourselves available 24/7 to answer your questions or discuss your case whenever something comes up. o learn more and to schedule, a free consultation with an Ohio criminal defense lawyer, call us at 937-222-1515. You can also reach us through our online contact form.

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How Are Juvenile Crimes Punished In Ohio?

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If you have a child who has run into trouble with the law in Ohio, you are probably worried about what could happen to them. It’s only natural to worry about their well-being. In addition to many worries a parent has when their child runs into trouble, you are probably wondering about the punishment for juvenile crimes.  It might help you to learn that juvenile crimes and punishment are different from adult punishment. However, even if the punishment is less severe in juvenile court, the wrong result could still have a tremendously negative impact on your child’s future. That’s why your child might need a strong advocate to help them achieve the best result possible. Gounaris Abboud, LPA—one of Ohio’s most recognized criminal defense law firms—has tremendous experience helping young people minimize their trouble after getting arrested for juvenile crimes in Ohio. Contact us today to get started.  What Is the Juvenile Crimes Definition in Ohio? As you may know, the State can prosecute some children as adults. Therefore, you should understand what a juvenile crime is in Ohio. A juvenile or “child” is a person under 18. Therefore, any child who commits a crime must go to juvenile court. If a case starts out in juvenile court, that court retains jurisdiction over the case until the child turns 21. The court keeps jurisdiction over the disposition of the case unless the court transfers the case or the child is deemed a serious youthful offender. Juvenile courts hear misdemeanor and felony cases as well as juvenile traffic cases. However, juvenile courts do not find a child guilty or not guilty. Instead, they use the word “delinquent” unless the child faces trial in adult court.  What Are the Most Common Juvenile Crimes? Unfortunately, some juvenile offenders face charges for very serious crimes like murder and rape. Those crimes are not that common. The most common juvenile crimes include: Assault and battery; Possession of alcohol as a minor;  Disorderly conduct; Disturbing a school assembly; Possession of narcotics; and Underage driving.  As you can see, some crimes are ones of status. In other words, an adult cannot commit some of these crimes that, by their very definition, are only crimes when minors commit them. Sadly, some juveniles get into serious trouble. They can face charges such as: Drug trafficking; Weapons possession; Driving under the influence; Sexual assault; and  Murder. These are some examples of adult charges juveniles might face in Ohio.  How Does the Court Determine Juvenile Crimes and Punishment? Ohio juvenile courts focus on rehabilitation. The assumption here is that when a minor breaks the law, it is likely related to some problems going on in their young lives. Juvenile justice aims to help identify and fix the problem before it’s too late, and the child becomes an adult offender. The hope is they can grow up to be productive adults by avoiding the pitfalls and revolving doors of the adult criminal justice system. The court strives to rehabilitate youthful offenders by looking after their physical, mental, emotional, and intellectual well-being. However, this doesn’t mean that children get off without any punishment whatsoever.  Punishment for juvenile crimes is a graduated process. Courts start with the goal of imposing the most lenient penalty possible, depending on the charge. Sanctions then increase as the severity of the crime increases, with the most severe punishment ending in detention at a locked facility. The court has to consider public safety as well as the rehabilitation of the child. That essentially means that the punishment must fit the crime. It can be a delicate balance.  Dispositional Hearing Juvenile judges determine the appropriate penalty for juvenile cases at a dispositional hearing. The judge tries to get as much information about the child as possible before they work to balance all of these competing goals. Judges will want information such as the child’s family history, school history, and perhaps even medical history if it’s relevant. The judge will review the materials and assess the child, the crime, the situation, and the competing goals mentioned above before making an informed decision. Then the judge will hand down a sentence and dispose of the case.   The sentences will range depending on the allegations. However, typical juvenile punishments include: Probation; House arrest; Curfew; Mental health treatment; Counseling;  Community service; and Detention in a juvenile detention facility. A court can send your child to the Ohio Department of Youth Services after a delinquent finding for either a felony or misdemeanor. Detention for a misdemeanor is a maximum of three months.  What Is the Punishment for Juvenile Crimes if the Court Tries Your Child As an Adult? The severity of the offenses brought against your child, as well as their criminal history, will determine whether their case ends up in juvenile or adult court. The first category of offenses that could result in your child facing trial as an adult include: Murder, Aggravated murder,  Attempted murder, or Attempted aggravated murder. Your child could go to adult court for these charges if they are 16 years old or if they are 14 or 15 and have an adjudication of delinquency on their record for another serious crime. The second category of offenses that can be heard in adult court are: Manslaughter, Rape, Kidnapping, Burglary, Arson, or  Felonious sexual penetration.  Your child might be tried as an adult if the State charges them with one of these crimes and they have a prior criminal record, or the current allegations involve the use of a firearm.  Contact a Juvenile Defense Attorney Today Contacting an experienced Dayton, Ohio juvenile crimes defense attorney from Gounaris Abboud, LPA could give your child a chance to avoid punishment or suffer minimal punishment for their juvenile acts. We are a firm that has been recognized by our peers for our excellent work. We have been included in the Ohio Super Lawyers list, and we’ve been ranked in the National Trial Lawyers “Top 100 Trial Lawyers” list. You can trust us with your...

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