• Award Image
  • Award Image
  • Award Image
  • Award Image
  • Award Image
  • Award Image
  • Award Image
  • Award Image

Trustworthy. Empathetic. Honest. Supportive.

Hear what else our clients are saying about us.

  • I found Gounaris and Abboud through good online reviews. Mr. Abboud handled my cases very professionally for two years. He truly takes his cases to heart and cares about his clients. He keeps you informed and has all the answers to all your questions. You really feel safe with Mr. Abboud as your lawyer. I would highly recommend him to anyone needing professional family law representation.

    Patty M.
  • Attorney Nick Gounaris handled my case and he did a wonderful job. I am very pleased with this law firm. I have never been in the situation I found myself in ever before and it was scary and confusing, but Nick and his staff were wonderful with answering my many questions and they were very sympathetic and understanding, always quick to respond when I would call. I am happy with the outcome of my case. If you find yourself in a situation that needs legal help, these are the guys to call!

    Melinda Q.
  • They did absolutely everything possible to help reduce the sentence and charges faced. The fees for their services were worth every cent and superior to any public defendant representation. They both put their hearts into their work and care like nobody else I have ever encountered in the legal system.

    Karis F.

A crime, an accusal, or a DUI
can change your life.

When facing high-stakes legal situations like these, it’s comforting to know that you can trust the team representing you. Nick Gounaris has been included in the list of Super Lawyers® in the field of criminal defense for a number of years. Similarly, Tony Abboud has received a 10.0 “Superb” rating by Avvo and has been included in the Ohio Super Lawyers® list for a number of years.

As a top criminal lawyer in Dayton, our award-winning criminal attorneys are available 24/7, and we only stop when we achieve the best possible results for you and your loved ones.

We will fight to get you the best possible outcome, reduce or dismiss charges & keep you out of jail. If you are facing any criminal charges, DUI, federal crime, personal injury, or need a family law attorney, we can help you. We know what to look for in Police and FBI reports when building your defense. Working in Ohio and Federal courts, we offer the experience to handle any legal challenge with personal attention and service.

Recognized by Super Lawyers, Avvo, Ohio State Bar Association, the Federal Bar Association, and The National Trial Lawyers Top 100, the criminal defense attorneys at Gounaris Abboud have extensive trial experience and ensure our clients are vigorously advocated for.

Our criminal defense lawyers are always ready to provide clients with aggressive and reliable representation throughout Dayton, OH. Our criminal lawyers in Dayton always have your best interest in the front of our minds and provide legal representation to provide the best possible outcome for your case.

Contact a Dayton criminal defense attorney to get started working on your case.

Let’s get to work on your case.
About Our Firm

Dayton Criminal Lawyers With Extensive Legal knowledge

Blog Post Featured Image

What Is Federal Conspiracy and What Are the Penalties?

| Read Time: 4 minutes

The federal authorities never let go when they sink their teeth into someone in a criminal investigation. They will use all of the criminal laws found in the U.S. Code to the fullest extent to break up criminal enterprises. One of their favorite tactics involves slapping a federal conspiracy charge on anyone even remotely involved with the target of the investigation. The feds do this because they know they can get a co-conspirator to testify against the people they really want to secure a conviction on. A conviction for conspiracy, or any federal charge, can have devastating consequences for you and your family. You need to speak with a skilled federal defense lawyer right away if a federal law enforcement agency involves you in their investigation. The experienced federal defense attorneys with Gounaris Abboud, LPA, understand what you’re up against. They are willing and ready to help you get the best result for your federal conspiracy charge. What Is the Federal Conspiracy Law? The primary federal conspiracy statute is 18 U.S.C. 371. It says that a conspiracy against the United States occurs when two or more people conspire to commit an act that is a crime under the U.S. Code. It is also a crime to conspire to defraud the United States. However, the crime of conspiracy is not complete unless one of the co-conspirators does an overt act to further the conspiracy. What does it mean to conspire with someone? A conspiracy is an agreement between two or more people to commit an act. The essence of conspiracy is the unlawful agreement. Even if you and your partner never committed the crime you planned, you are still part of a conspiracy. For example, you and a partner hatch a plan to rob a federally insured bank. Talking about it does not amount to the crime of conspiracy. However, taking a step toward completing the goal forms the crime of conspiracy. Therefore, casing the bank you want to rob—either alone or with your co-conspirator—forms the basis of the crime of conspiracy under federal law. Other Examples of Federal Conspiracy Charges The U.S. Code contains several other conspiracy charges as well. Some examples of additional federal conspiracy charges include conspiring against: Impeding the free exercise of rights (18 USC 241); Defrauding the Government concerning claims (18 USC 286); Impeding or injuring an officer (18 USC 372); Aiding prisoners of war or enemy aliens (18 USC 757); Gathering or delivering defense information to assist a foreign government (18 USC 794); Drug trafficking and other drug offenses (21 USC 846): Injuring a person or property in a foreign country while under U.S. jurisdiction (18 USC 956); Kidnapping (18 USC 1201); Destroying a boat to defraud an insurance company (18 USC 2271); Sedition (18 USC 2384); Interfering with armed forces during a time of war (18 USC 2388); Destruction of war material (18 USC 2153); and Interfering with the production of war material (18 USC 2154). The U.S. Code contains many other instances of conspiracy. It’s important to note that the general conspiracy charge found in 18 USC 371 requires an overt act to form the conspiracy, but many of the others do not.  What Are the Federal Conspiracy Penalties? A federal conspiracy sentence depends on the crime that is the object of the conspiracy. The penalty for conspiring to commit a crime against the United States is a prison sentence of no more than five years. Section 371 also indicates that the court may levy a fine in addition to sending the conspirator to federal prison. However, the maximum sentence for a conspiracy whose object is a misdemeanor carries the same penalty as the misdemeanor.  The potential consequences of conspiracy will depend on the conspiracy charge the government files. Some conspiracy statutes specify a penalty, while others state that the penalty is the same for conspiracy as it would be for the completed crime. For instance, conspiracy to commit drug trafficking carries the same prison sentence as drug trafficking.  What Rights Do You Have If the Feds Charged You with Conspiracy? You always have the right to remain silent and have an attorney present during police questioning. The Miranda warning applies to federal law enforcement just as it does to local police. Ask for an attorney before giving a statement.  The Department of Justice prosecutes federal crimes. Their lawyers work closely with federal agents to make airtight cases. The chances are good that they have a lot of evidence against you if they file criminal charges. However, that does not mean you are automatically guilty.  You have Due Process rights to a fair trial judged by a jury of your peers. You also have the right to confront witnesses who testify against you and call witnesses on your behalf. However, prosecutors often build cases against low-level conspirators to get to the top of the criminal enterprise. Federal prosecutors may “proffer” you to find out what information you have that can help them. In exchange for your information and testimony, they would likely give you a good plea deal for your role in the conspiracy. Your lawyer will negotiate the terms of your agreement with the prosecutor on your behalf.  Contact an Experienced Federal Defense Attorney in Dayton, OH Today Fighting a case in the U.S. District Court takes a tremendous amount of knowledge, skill, and experience. The federal defense attorneys with Gounaris Abboud, LPA, have the experience you need to help defend against your federal conspiracy charges successfully. Do not wait and see what happens before calling. Contact our office today at 937-222-1515. We have more than 50 years of collective experience fighting for our client’s rights. We will give you the time and attention you need to handle your legal issues successfully.

Read More
Blog Post Featured Image

What Happens If You Forget Your Court Date In Ohio?

| Read Time: 4 minutes

We all forget things from time to time; it’s part of life. But sometimes we even forget really important things—including court appearances. If you’ve missed your court appearance, you might be wondering if you have a bench warrant out for your arrest. You might also worry that you could go to jail because you missed court.  Not addressing a missed court date because you’re afraid of going to jail will only make matters worse. Instead, contact the Ohio criminal defense lawyers from Gounaris Abboud, LPA. Our knowledgeable criminal defense attorneys have the skills you need to help keep you out of jail. What Is a Bench Warrant? You may have heard the term and wondered, What is a bench warrant? The bench warrant meaning is unfamiliar to many people. A bench warrant is a warrant for your arrest issued by a judge rather than at the request of the police. Despite the distinction between the issuing authority, there is no fundamental difference between an arrest warrant and a bench warrant in Ohio. Both authorize law enforcement to take the wanted person into custody and bring that person before the judge. In fact, a police officer has no discretion but to arrest you once the officer learns there is a warrant out for your arrest.  What Happens If You Forget Your Court Date? Every person who has a case pending before an Ohio criminal court must go to court as scheduled. The judge can and likely will issue a bench warrant if you miss criminal court dates. The court clerk enters the bench warrant into the court’s computer system, and that system alerts the local police. The warrant may also appear in the state DMV database.  The police can come to your home, or workplace, or stop you in public to arrest you on a warrant. People with warrants often get arrested when police stop them for a motor vehicle infraction. When the officer runs the driver’s information, the arrest warrant pops up, giving the officer no choice but to arrest you. What Happens After Your Arrest on a Bench Warrant? The Ohio Rules of Criminal Procedure set out the process that police and courts follow after your arrest. The officer in charge of the booking facility must obey the orders on the warrant. Some warrants are not bailable, while others might order you to post a high bond. If your charges are misdemeanors, the officer in charge can issue a summons if they believe you will appear in court instead of holding you in jail. The officer can clear the warrant from the system after issuing the summons. Otherwise, you have to wait until the judge cancels the warrant when you go to court. The officer in charge does not have the authority to release you with a summons if you have felony charges.  How to Clear a Bench Warrant Without Going to Jail People miss court for a variety of reasons. Sometimes people simply forget. Other times, people intentionally skip court because they’re afraid of what could happen if they go.  Conflicts can also arise in people’s lives. Even though going to court is the right thing to do, life doesn’t always make that easy. You might have child care issues, car troubles, or a sick parent who needs care on the same day you have to go to court. Also, your court notice might have gone to your old address without you knowing about it.  Whatever the reason for missing court, the next steps you take determine what could happen when you ultimately appear before a judge. You cannot hide from a warrant forever. So the question is, do you want to walk into court to remove the warrant voluntarily or be forced to appear after getting arrested?  If you appear with your lawyer voluntarily, you have a greater chance of not going to jail. Your lawyer could present arguments and successfully argue that the court should not remand you to jail or have you post a high bail. A good lawyer can explain that you had a valid excuse for missing court and assure the judge that you will appear as ordered going forward. Additionally, having a competent and respected criminal lawyer shows that you respect the court and are serious about making the rest of your court dates.   On the other hand, remaining on the run and hoping the case never catches up to you shows that you are a flight risk. So if you continue to try to elude law enforcement, a judge can raise your bail, hold you in jail without bail, or add conditions of release to make sure you return to court. Remove Your Bench Warrant with Confidence If you have more questions regarding missed court dates or your criminal case in general, call Gounaris Abboud, LPA, right away at 937-222-1515. Our award-winning and reputable criminal defense lawyers can work with you to remove your warrant and help you stay out of jail. We have more than 50 years of combined experience, and we enjoy a great professional reputation in the legal community. We’ve won numerous recognitions and awards, including being named in the Ohio Super Lawyers List, making the Top 100 Trial Lawyers List from the National Trial Lawyers Association, and we enjoy an excellent 10 out of 10 rating on AVVO. Not acting on a bench warrant and waiting to see what happens next only makes matters worse. So don’t hesitate. Contact us today for more information.

Read More
Blog Post Featured Image

What Are the Laws and Penalties for Shoplifting in Ohio?

| Read Time: 4 minutes

Shoplifting crimes may seem like minor offenses. However, the shoplifting laws in Ohio fall under the general category of theft. Since theft crimes can either be misdemeanors or felonies, you should be aware of the negative consequences a theft conviction could have on your life. Having a dedicated and experienced Ohio criminal defense lawyer by your side can help you resolve your case favorably. The Dayton criminal defense lawyers with Gounaris Abboud, LPA, do more than aggressively defend your case. When you work with our firm, you will experience the difference a trustworthy, empathetic, honest, and supportive attorney can make in your life.  Shoplifting Charges in Ohio Shoplifting in Ohio has two meanings. You might think that shoplifting only takes place when someone conceals an item and walks out of a store without paying. However, deceiving the store owner to pay less for an item is also shoplifting. You might not realize it, but changing the price on an item by either altering the price tag or by switching the price tag from one item to another is shoplifting. That’s harder to do these days when most stores don’t use price tags and rely on UPC barcodes for pricing. But switching packaging is also shoplifting when you pay less for the item than indicated for that specific item.  Ohio Shoplifting Penalties  Shoplifting penalties range in severity depending on the value of the stolen items. Although the term shoplifting implies that the stolen items are small and easily concealed, the theft statute in Ohio allows someone to serve up to 10 years in prison, depending on the situation.  Under the Ohio theft law, a conviction for stealing property valued at less than $1,000 is petty theft and is a first-degree misdemeanor. The maximum penalty for a first-degree misdemeanor is 180 days in jail and a maximum fine of $1,000. The punishments become more serious as the value of the stolen property increases. Stolen merchandise valued between $1,000 and $7,500 constitutes a fifth-degree felony. You could serve between six months to one year in jail and have to pay a $2,500 fine.  Stealing property valued between $7,500 and $150,000 is a fourth-degree felony. The punishment ranges from 6 to 18 months in jail and a $5,000 fine. You face third-degree felony charges for theft of property worth $150,000 up to $750,000. The punishment for this charge is a prison sentence of one to five years and a fine of no more than $10,000. Second-degree felony theft is the appropriate charge for property stolen that has a value of at least $750,000 but less than $1,500,000. The prison term for this sentence falls between two and eight years, along with a fine of $15,000.  Stealing property worth more than $1,500,000 is a first-degree felony. The sentence for this offense is 3 to 10 years in prison and a $20,000 fine. Additional Shoplifting Penalties You could face civil liability for shoplifting in addition to criminal sanctions. As a result, the judge may order you to make restitution to the store owner for the value of the goods stolen. Also, you are liable for any damages the store incurred beyond the value of the stolen property. For instance, the court could find that you damaged property while fleeing the store. If so, the judge may order you to pay for those losses as well. You should understand that civil liability could entail paying the plaintiff’s attorney’s fees and court costs as well. A felony conviction carries collateral consequences on top of the penalties described above. A felony conviction for theft could be impossible to seal or expunge from your record. You might also have a difficult time finding work or keeping your job if your employer considers theft to be a crime of dishonesty. A theft conviction may hamper your pursuit of educational opportunities as well. A felony theft conviction could endanger your immigration status if you are not a U.S. citizen. Additionally, you could lose your ability to become a naturalized citizen or be refused re-entry into the country. You could also lose the right to vote and your right to possess a firearm.  Why Do I Need a Lawyer for My Shoplifting Charge? The shoplifting laws in Ohio are strict. You could go to jail even after a conviction for petty theft. Moreover, as the value of the stolen property increases, so does the likelihood that you will go to prison. Having a skilled Ohio criminal defense attorney fight for you can protect your rights. You have only one chance to defend your case successfully. Making a mistake while trying to defend yourself—even from misdemeanor shoplifting charges—can hurt you in the long run. Seeking advice from a skilled attorney with extensive experience defending the rights of the accused gives you the best chance to minimize the impact your charges will have on your life. Work with a Dayton Law Firm That Cares About Your Future Call Gounaris Abboud, LPA, today at 937-222-1515 or contact us online to speak with one of our experienced and compassionate criminal defense lawyers. Our award-winning attorneys will explain your options and plot a course of action that can help you get the best results for the circumstances surrounding your case. We may be able to get the prosecutor to agree to a favorable plea, reduce your charges, or possibly even dismiss your case altogether. With our extensive legal knowledge and dedication to your well-being, we can make a difference for you. 

Read More