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Trustworthy. Empathetic. Honest. Supportive.

Hear what else our clients are saying about us.

  • I found Gounaris and Abboud through good online reviews. Mr. Abboud handled my cases very professionally for two years. He truly takes his cases to heart and cares about his clients. He keeps you informed and has all the answers to all your questions. You really feel safe with Mr. Abboud as your lawyer. I would highly recommend him to anyone needing professional family law representation.

    Patty M.
  • Attorney Nick Gounaris handled my case and he did a wonderful job. I am very pleased with this law firm. I have never been in the situation I found myself in ever before and it was scary and confusing, but Nick and his staff were wonderful with answering my many questions and they were very sympathetic and understanding, always quick to respond when I would call. I am happy with the outcome of my case. If you find yourself in a situation that needs legal help, these are the guys to call!

    Melinda Q.
  • They did absolutely everything possible to help reduce the sentence and charges faced. The fees for their services were worth every cent and superior to any public defendant representation. They both put their hearts into their work and care like nobody else I have ever encountered in the legal system.

    Karis F.

A divorce, an accusal, or an injury
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When facing high-stakes legal situations like these, it’s comforting to know that you can trust the team representing you.

At Gounaris Abboud, our awarded attorneys are available 24/7, and we only stop when we achieve the best possible results for you and your loved ones.

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About Our Firm

Legal knowledge, case results, firm news, and more on our blog.

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What Happens If You Fail To Appear in Court for a Traffic Ticket?

| Read Time: 4 minutes

Make Sure You Appear in Court If You Want to Avoid Additional Consequences Woody Allen allegedly said that 90% of life is just showing up. Judges in Ohio traffic courts require 100% attendance—showing up 9 out 10 times won’t cut it. You could be in a lot of trouble if you miss your speeding ticket court appearance. Missing your court date is never a good thing. Even in times of a global pandemic, you need to appear in court. Not only will you lose your ticket appeal, but the judge might also issue a warrant for your arrest, assess costs against you, and even suspend your license.  What should you do if you can’t make your court appearance for a speeding ticket or another moving infraction? The traffic defense lawyers with Gounaris Abboud can help you with your traffic ticket defense. They can go to traffic court with you—or for you—and protect your rights. Why It’s Imperative That You Go to Court You have the right to fight your speeding ticket or other traffic offense in court. These crimes are referred to as minor misdemeanors. You can pay the ticket—thereby admitting guilt—and avoid going to court.  However, there are consequences that stem from accumulating too many traffic tickets. For example, the state could suspend your driver’s license. Additionally, your insurance company could increase your coverage rates or drop you altogether. Moreover, if you have a commercial driver’s license, the state could revoke your ability to make a living by driving. Therefore, it makes sense to fight a traffic offense to protect your driving record as well as your way of life. You can go to court to contest the traffic violation allegations if you want. You must appear in court at the date and time the court assigns to you. You have the chance to plead not guilty and have a trial.  Keep in mind, you have a legal obligation to appear in court if the police charge you with a felony or misdemeanor traffic crime. Traffic crimes carry the possibility of going to jail. You must appear at your arraignment date and trial date; otherwise, the court can take matters into its own hands. Consequences for Missing Court When Your Speeding Ticket Court Appearance Is Required Traffic courts are busy. They don’t have the luxury of wasting time processing your case and then putting the resources into it if you don’t show up. The time courts spend on your case is time spent away from someone else’s. Additionally, the prosecution has to call witnesses to come to court for your trial. This costs the state money. Consequently, magistrates and judges can punish you for not appearing. The court can enter a default finding on your docket if you don’t come to court. If you have minor misdemeanor traffic charges, then the judge will find you guilty and order you to pay the fine and associated fees. However, the court will issue a bench warrant for you if you have criminal offenses on your ticket. Having a bench warrant lodged against you means that you are subject to arrest when you’re in public. What are the implications of having a bench warrant out against you? Having a warrant is no way to live. The police can arrest you any time they encounter you. You might think you can avoid the police, but sometimes you don’t have a choice. If you are involved in a fender-bender, get stopped for a traffic offense, or have to call the police if you witness a crime, then you will be arrested. Police often “run” your information when they learn your name. They have to arrest you if the court issued a warrant for your apprehension. You will be brought to court after your arrest if the court is open at that time. If not, you might have to post bond if you are eligible. If you can’t post bond, then you could end up staying in jail until the next time court opens. Therefore, you could spend an entire weekend in jail awaiting your court appearance all because you didn’t go to court when you should have. Additional Consequences for Missing a Court Appearance for a Speeding Ticket Can you imagine your life if a police officer threw the cuffs on you and took you to jail because you missed a court appearance? How would you explain your arrest to your family? What would you say to your boss? You might be embarrassed, especially if you’ve never been in trouble before. Don’t let this happen to you.  How Can Gounaris Abboud Help? Gounaris Abboud’s defense attorneys can help you in a variety of ways. First, you can lean on our tremendous experience to help you out of a jam. As we’ve discussed, there are many reasons why you might want to fight a speeding ticket. Gounaris Abboud’s defense lawyers appear in traffic courts in Ohio regularly. We can appear on your behalf and may be able to get your ticket cleared up. If the court insists that you personally appear for your hearing, then Gounaris Abboud’s ticket defense lawyers can ask for another date if you can’t come to court for a valid reason. We can argue your case for you and give you the best possible chance to win your ticket appeal.  Contact Gounaris Abboud Today for Further Information About What Happens If You Fail to Appear in Court for a Traffic Ticket Call Gounaris Abboud today at 937-222-1515 to learn more about how we can protect your rights. Our award-winning traffic ticket defense lawyers have the experience and knowledge you need to win your traffic ticket case.

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Involuntary Manslaughter in Ohio

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Charges of Ohio Involuntary Manslaughter Can Lead to Lengthy Prison Sentences: Get the Help You Need Now We take driving for granted. We love our cars, and we are used to the freedom driving a car allows us to experience. In fact, our lives depend on our ability to drive.  We forget that driving a motor vehicle is dangerous. Despite knowing the dangers of driving, we mindlessly get in our cars to go to work or school. However, our complacency when we drive could put us in dangerous positions. This is especially true after having a couple of drinks and then driving.  If you are in an accident after you’ve had a couple of drinks and someone dies, then you could face charges of involuntary manslaughter in Ohio. An Ohio involuntary manslaughter sentence could leave you behind bars for up to a decade or more. The Ohio involuntary manslaughter defense lawyers with Gounaris Abboud have helped countless clients who thought they had no way to win their case avoid the harsh penalties imposed by Ohio law. Gounaris Abboud’s experience, resources, and skills can help give you the best chance to avoid a long involuntary manslaughter sentence in Ohio. What Is Involuntary Manslaughter by Motor Vehicle in Ohio? Involuntary manslaughter by motor vehicle in Ohio generally refers to charges stemming from a fatal motor vehicle accident. Ohio law categorizes the charges based on the circumstances of how the crash occurred. The categories of crimes are: Aggravated vehicular homicide; Vehicular homicide; and Vehicular manslaughter. The penalties vary for these offenses depending on the facts of the case and your criminal record if you have one.  Aggravated Vehicular Homicide By OVI  In Ohio, a person is guilty of a second-degree felony for being the proximate cause of someone’s death in an accident if operating a vehicle while intoxicated, under the influence of drugs, or both.  Ohio law defines this offense as aggravated vehicular homicide. A person convicted of aggravated vehicular homicide faces a minimum mandatory prison sentence. Under Ohio law, the judge must impose a minimum mandatory sentence of two, three, four, five, six, seven, or eight years. That means you are not eligible for parole or early release until you serve the minimum sentence.  The judge has to follow a formula that sets the maximum term you spent in prison. After the judge sets the minimum mandatory term of your sentence for involuntary manslaughter in Ohio, then the judge must set the maximum sentence. Ohio law instructs the judge to add 50% to the minimum sentence to arrive at the maximum sentence. The state will also revoke your license or driving privileges for life.  Ohio law allows the prosecution to bring charges against you that have enhanced sentences if certain conditions exist. You face a first-degree felony conviction for aggravated vehicular homicide if you meet those conditions. The prosecution can ask the judge to increase your involuntary manslaughter sentence in Ohio if you: Have three previous convictions for DUI/OVI within 10 years; Have a previous conviction for assault or manslaughter involving a traffic offense; Were driving without a license or on a suspended license; or Committed a combination of any of these offenses. A conviction for first-degree aggravated vehicular manslaughter could send you to prison for as long as 15 years or more depending on your record. Aggravated Vehicular Homicide by Reckless Conduct Aggravated vehicular homicide by reckless conduct is a third-degree felony. Recklessness is consciously disregarding an unjustifiable risk of harm. If a person died in an accident and you were driving recklessly or committing a reckless driving offense in a construction zone, then you are guilty of Aggravated Vehicular Homicide by Reckless conduct. You could spend up to five years in prison for a third-degree felony conviction. Your charges of involuntary manslaughter in Ohio could rise to a second-degree felony if the prosecution proves that enhanced sentences should be imposed. Enhanced sentences usually apply when you have prior convictions or drove while your license was suspended. Vehicular Homicide The charge of vehicular homicide applies to the death of someone in an accident caused by the negligent conduct of the driver. This charge also applies to the death of a person killed by a speeder in a construction zone if the crash occurred within the construction zone. A person drives negligently when failing to abide by the standard of care all drivers are expected to observe. The crime of vehicular homicide is a misdemeanor in the first degree. The maximum jail sentence is 180 days. However, the court must send anyone convicted of vehicular homicide to jail for a minimum of 15 days. You could face fourth-degree felony charges if your license was suspended or revoked when the fatal crash happened. Vehicular Manslaughter The term vehicular manslaughter in Ohio applies to car crashes that occur when the driver commits a minor misdemeanor that causes the death of another. Accidentally running a red light or not stopping at a stop sign are examples of minor misdemeanors. The maximum penalty for vehicular manslaughter by vehicle in Ohio is 90 days in jail. Notwithstanding, the prosecutor could ask to upgrade the charge to a first-degree misdemeanor if you drove on a suspended license when the crash happened. Defenses to Ohio Involuntary Manslaughter Charges in Ohio The types of defenses available to you will depend on the facts of the case and your criminal record. You must not wait too long before talking to a qualified attorney about your case. Otherwise, you might lose out on valuable evidence that could help you with your defense.  At Gounaris Abboud, we aggressively pursue every avenue of defense available to you, so you have the best chance of winning your case. In some instances, the best defense is trying to knock evidence out of court because the police violated your rights. Sometimes, the best defense might be showing the jury that the prosecution can’t prove the case beyond a reasonable doubt. If those avenues of defense may not...

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What Teen Drivers Should Know Before Getting Behind the Wheel in Ohio

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Many parents know when it’s time for their teenager to get behind the wheel. However, parents do not always realize the extensive requirements for obtaining a temporary permit, the rules that apply specifically to teenage drivers, and the steps necessary for securing a regular driver’s license once your teenager reaches the appropriate age. New Ohio teen driving laws can cause added confusion, leading parents to think that the requirements or restrictions for teen driving have changed.  If you are looking for information about Ohio’s teen driving laws, you came to the right place. Reach out to our team at Gounaris Abboud today to learn more. What Are Ohio’s Teenage Driver Laws?  The Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV) allows teenagers who are fifteen-and-a-half years old to obtain a temporary instruction permit identification card (TIPIC) once they pass a written and vision test. The BMV offers the written test on a computer at most of its locations. If your teenager fails the written test, they can retake the test after 24 hours have passed. The written test contains 40 multiple choice questions about Ohio traffic regulations and signs. The BMV requires at least a 75% score on the test. After receiving a passing score, the teen driver has 60 days to purchase the TIPIC. If your teen driver is under 16 years old, the TIPIC authorizes him or her to practice driving on public roads, but only when a parent, guardian, or certified driving instructor occupies the front passenger seat of the vehicle. If the teen driver is older than 16 but under 18, he or she can practice driving with a licensed driver over the age of 21 in the front passenger seat. Obtaining an Ohio Driver’s License After holding the TIPIC for six months and satisfying other requirements, your teen driver can obtain an Ohio driver’s license. During the six month period, the teen driver must satisfy requirements including: Completion of a driver’s education course; 24 hours of classroom instruction; 8 hours of driving instruction; and 50 hours of supervised driving experience, at least 10 of which occur at night. When these requirements are satisfied, your teen driver can contact any Ohio driver’s license exam station and schedule a skills test. The skills test involves an actual road test using your teen’s own vehicle. If your teen fails the skills test, he or she must wait seven days before attempting the test again. Ohio Teenage Driving Restrictions Teens’ driver’s licenses in Ohio are subject to certain restrictions. Some of those restrictions fall off after holding the license for 12 months, but other restrictions remain in place until your teen turns 18. During the first twelve months, Ohio’s teenage driving laws place the following restrictions on teen drivers: Prohibition on driving between 10 PM and 5 AM absent specific circumstances; Only one non-family member as a passenger at a time, unless a parent or guardian is present; All occupants must wear seatbelts; and Use of mobile devices is strictly prohibited. After they hold a driver’s license for at least 12 months, Ohio allows teen drivers to operate their vehicle at any time of night if accompanied by a parent or guardian, but other restrictions still apply. Violating these restrictions can result in your teen being unable to drive without parental supervision for up to six months or until the teenager turns 17 years old, whichever happens first. Multiple violations can result in revocation of the probationary license. Consequences for Violation of Ohio’s Teenage Driving Laws Ohio implements strict laws punishing distracted driving. Ohio defines distracted driving as “engaging in any activity that is not necessary to the operation of a vehicle and impairs, or reasonably would be expected to impair, the ability of the operator to drive the vehicle safely.” For drivers over 18, the use of a handheld electronic device does not, on its own, give Ohio law enforcement authorities the ability to stop the driver. However, if the driver is under 18, the use of a handheld device does give police authorization to pull the teen driver over. A first violation results in a 60-day license suspension and a $150 fine. A second violation results in a 1-year license suspension and a $300 fine. Because the legal drinking age is 21, authorities have authorization to charge drivers under 21 with a blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) of at least .02 percent but less than .08 percent with “Operating a Vehicle After Underage Consumption.” The maximum potential penalties include up to two years of license suspension, a remedial driving course, re-taking the driver’s license examination, and four points assessed to your license.  Contact Us for Questions About Ohio Teen Driving Laws Traffic violations can negatively affect not only your teenager’s ability to drive, but also your insurance coverage prices. While the violation may seem minor, the consequences can affect your teenager in more ways than one. By hiring a traffic attorney that specializes in Ohio’s teenage driving laws, you can ensure that no stone is left unturned in avoiding a traffic conviction. We will review the circumstances surrounding your case and formulate a defense strategy to help you obtain a favorable result. With over 50 years of courtroom experience, we are confident in our ability to represent you in an aggressive and efficient manner. Contact our office today to start your free consultation.

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