child endangerment ohio

Any criminal charge involving children will often result in high stress and amplified emotion. A charge of child endangerment is no exception.  Child endangerment is an extremely serious charge in Ohio, and penalties can be severe. Thus, in most cases, it is absolutely necessary to work with an experienced criminal defense attorney who can help defend you against one of the most difficult charges you can face.  If you are facing a child endangerment charge in or near Dayton, OH, consider consulting with an attorney today to discuss your case and determine how best to move forward. Ohio Child Endangerment Laws: An Overview Ohio defines child endangerment in Ohio Revised Code § 2929.22. Under this statute, it is a violation to “create a substantial risk to the health or safety of the child, by violating a duty of care, protection, or support.” Additionally, a “child,” for purposes of Ohio child endangerment laws, includes anyone under the age of 18, or a mentally or physically handicapped person who is under the age of 21.  This definition of child endangerment is broad. However, the Ohio Revised Code does provide some additional definition. Specifically, the following will constitute child endangerment in Ohio:  Abuse of the child;  Torture or cruel abuse of the child;  Prolonged corporal punishment or other physical disciplinary measures that are “excessive under the circumstances”; Repeated disciplinary measures that, if continued, would seriously impair the child’s mental health or development; and Enticing, coercing, or permitting a child to participate in any act that is obscene or sexual in nature.  While this list is not exclusive, it is important to understand the types of activities that may constitute child endangerment in Ohio.  It is also important to note that under this section, parents are not the only parties that can be found guilty of child endangerment. Under Ohio law, any of the following can be charged with child endangerment:  Parents,  Guardians,  Custodians,  Persons having custody or control of a child, or  Persons in loco parentis of a child.  For clarity, “in loco parentis” means any adult who is the caretaker of a child. This includes relatives, foster parents, or stepparents who have the rights, duties, and responsibilities of a parent.  Penalties for Child Endangerment in Ohio Placing a child’s life at risk is a serious offense. Thus, the penalties for child endangerment charges in Ohio are severe.  A first offense for child endangerment will result in a first-degree misdemeanor. Consequences for such a conviction include up to 6 months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000. However, if this is not your first conviction, the penalties can be even more severe. Depending on whether you have prior offenses and whether the child sustained severe injuries, a conviction for child endangerment can be elevated as high as a second-degree felony. Under Ohio law, a felony of the second degree can result in up to 8 years in prison and a fine of up to $15,000.  Contact a Criminal Defense Attorney Today A charge for child endangerment has the potential to impact your rights as a caretaker for a child. Additionally, a charge can impact your reputation and lead to harsh criminal penalties. We understand how difficult it can feel to face a charge of child endangerment in Ohio. However, know that you are not alone.  At Gounaris Abboud, LPA, we are prepared to help you through this difficult time and will strive to provide you with the best defense the law can provide. Our team of criminal defense lawyers has over 50 years of collective experience providing high-quality legal counsel to clients in need. Contact us online or by phone at 937-222-1515 for a free consultation to see how we can help you.

Read More

A University of Dayton student had just returned back from summer break when she went to a semester kick-off party and became seriously intoxicated. After having too much to drink, this student passed out near a building on campus. The police apprehended the girl when they noticed her near the building. Unfortunately, she got into a minor altercation with the police officers upon arrest and spent the remainder of her night in the Montgomery County Jail. The prosecutor and police filed a variety of different charges against her. While there was a whole host of charges against the woman, the largest charge was an assault on a police officer charge. This is considered a fourth degree felony. If convicted, these students would have been sent to prison for up to 18 months and given a $5,000 fine. The case was prosecuted in a Montgomery County Common Pleas Court in Dayton, Ohio. After her charges, this student came to Gounaris Abboud, LPA looking for help. Thankfully, the team was able to get her case dismissed through diversion/ILC. The prosecutor on the case agreed to reduce our client’s charge and instead issue a diversion program. After she completes the diversion program in about six months, our client will have her case dismissed. She will be able to leave court with a clean criminal record. This will help her to be able to secure a job in the future without worrying that a prior conviction could eliminate her ability to qualify. Gounaris Abboud, LPA takes joy in representing students of local universities as well as locals in the Dayton area with their alleged crimes. Contact the firm right away if you have been accused of a crime and need assistance in seeking a satisfactory verdict in your case!

Read More