If you’ve experienced the death of someone you love due to another person’s intentional actions or negligence, you may feel emotions of grief, anxiety, and anger.  Taking legal action can’t replace your loved one, and it can’t ease your loss. However, seeking justice for a wrongful death in Ohio can make the person responsible for this tragedy pay. A wrongful death lawsuit can provide for you and your family while preventing the same tragic action from impacting anyone else. If you’re considering a wrongful death lawsuit, you need to understand Ohio law. To learn more about the Ohio wrongful death statute, keep reading. Who Can File a Wrongful Death Lawsuit in Ohio? The Ohio wrongful death statute defines a wrongful death as one that is caused by a “wrongful act, neglect, or default” that would have been eligible for a personal injury lawsuit had the person not died. In other words, if you can sue for a personal injury caused by an action, your representatives can sue for a death caused by the same action. The personal representative (executor of the estate) of the decedent (person who died) can bring a wrongful death lawsuit in Ohio. The personal representative brings the wrongful death action on behalf of these people: The surviving spouse,  The decedent’s children,  The parents of the decedent, and Other next of kin. The family members of the decedent must have suffered harm from the wrongful death to recover compensation.  OHIO WRONGFUL DEATH STATUTE FAQ What Are Time Limits on a Wrongful Death Lawsuit? The wrongful death statute of limitations in Ohio limits the time you have to file a wrongful death lawsuit. The personal representative has two years from the date of the wrongful death to file a lawsuit. If you file a wrongful death lawsuit after the Ohio wrongful death statute of limitations runs out, the court will likely dismiss your case.  OHIO WRONGFUL DEATH STATUTE FAQ What Are Damages in a Wrongful Death Case? Wrongful death damages are the compensation available to survivors for the loss of their loved one. These damages reflect the harm that family members have suffered as a result of the wrongful death. Different types of damages may be compensated, including: Loss of support, meaning the loss of financial income the decedent would have provided; Loss of services, such as childcare, housework, or car repairs provided by the decedent; Loss of companionship, care, and affection of the decedent; Loss of inheritance the family members might have received were it not for the decedent’s untimely death; and Mental anguish suffered by family members. The surviving spouse, children, and parents are rebuttably presumed to have suffered damages from the wrongful death. The rebuttable caveat means that these family members will be entitled to damages unless a defendant can prove the wrongful death did not impact family members. Next of kin, other than a surviving spouse, parents, and children, must prove the damages they suffered from the wrongful death. OHIO WRONGFUL DEATH STATUTE FAQ Is Compensation Possible in a Wrongful Death Case? Compensation is possible if someone’s death was caused by another person’s negligence or intentional act. Examples of actions causing a wrongful death might include: Shooting someone, Stabbing someone, Driving drunk, Leaving the scene of an accident without calling for help, Failing to keep manufacturing machinery maintained, and Knowingly exposing a worker to asbestos. Intentionally causing someone’s death may seem rather obvious, but negligence can be more difficult to understand. To determine if a person’s negligence caused a death, you must prove three elements: The person had a duty of care, such as a duty to properly maintain equipment; The person breached that duty, such as by not maintaining the equipment; and The person’s breach of duty caused the wrongful death, such as faulty equipment fatally injuring the decedent. Even if the person responsible faces criminal homicide charges, you can still bring a civil wrongful death claim. In fact, it is often easier to prevail on a wrongful death claim because civil proceedings require a lower burden of proof. Criminal charges require proof beyond a reasonable doubt, while civil cases require a “preponderance of the evidence” (more likely than not) standard. OHIO WRONGFUL DEATH STATUTE FAQ How Can a Wrongful Death Attorney Help? A wrongful death attorney will listen to your case, explain the law to you, and advise you of your best legal options. Then the attorney will investigate to find more evidence, interview witnesses, and pursue a wrongful death claim. Your attorney may be able to negotiate a settlement so that you do not have to endure an emotionally challenging trial. However, if your attorney thinks a jury would return a higher award, you may choose to proceed to trial. If you think you may have a wrongful death case, call the experienced attorneys at Gounaris Abboud, LPA, at 937-222-1515, or contact us online for a free consultation. With nearly five decades of collective experience, our attorneys have the legal skill and compassion to help you in this difficult time. 

Read More

When you experience an auto accident, it brings your routine to a halt. Instead of making your way to work or school, you may need to seek medical attention and figure out alternative transportation. Then come the bills. Hospital costs and auto repairs add up to alarming dollar amounts. When the bills start piling up, you may decide to take a serious look at your auto insurance. What will it pay? What should it pay? One question you may ask when trying to evaluate your auto insurance involves a concept known as fault. Is Ohio a no-fault state for auto insurance? If so, how does this affect your claim? Keep reading for more information on Ohio auto insurance laws. IS OHIO A NO FAULT STATE FAQ What Does No-Fault Mean? A no-fault state requires your auto insurance to pay your medical expenses from an accident, even if the accident was not your fault. No-fault auto insurance usually pays medical bills up to a certain policy limit. If medical expenses exceed that limit, the policyholder may sue the driver who caused the accident.  So is Ohio a no-fault state for auto insurance? No, Ohio rejects this standard of compensation. So if you live in Ohio, no-fault state auto insurance rules do not apply. Ohio requires fault-based auto insurance claims. This means that you recover medical expenses and car repairs from the person who caused the accident.  IS OHIO A NO FAULT STATE FAQ How Does This Rule Affect Me?  Instead of filing a claim with your auto insurance, you file a claim with the at-fault party’s auto insurance. If the person who caused the accident is uninsured, then it’s up to you to pay your own accident expenses. Some drivers purchase an additional policy to cover accidents caused by an uninsured or underinsured driver.  The at-fault party’s insurance company may try to avoid paying for all your expenses from the accident. After all, the insurance company is trying to maximize its profits, and it doesn’t help them to pay large claims. If you feel intimidated trying to negotiate with the at-fault driver’s insurance company, an experienced car accident attorney can help. Insurance companies can intimidate injured claimants, but an experienced car accident attorney knows how to negotiate with an insurance company for a maximum settlement.  IS OHIO A NO FAULT STATE FAQ What Is Comparative Negligence?  When more than one person is at fault for an accident, each individual’s responsibility to pay is based on the principle of comparative negligence. Comparative negligence allows you to recover damages from another driver based on their percentage of fault. For instance, imagine that you sustained $100,000 worth of damages (such as medical bills and auto repairs) in an accident. If the other driver was 60% responsible for the accident and you were 40% responsible, you would be able to recover $60,000 from that driver.  In Ohio, you cannot recover anything from the other driver if you are more than 50% responsible for the accident.  IS OHIO A NO FAULT STATE FAQ How Can an Accident Attorney Help?  If you’ve experienced an accident due to someone else’s negligence, you need skilled legal representation to get the money you’re owed. An experienced car accident attorney can evaluate your case and advise you of your best legal options. The attorney will also investigate the details of the car accident, interview witnesses, and request compensation from the at-fault party’s insurance.  Most insurance companies want to settle, so a car accident attorney will press for the maximum settlement amount. However, if an insurance company refuses to cooperate with settlement negotiations, your attorney should be prepared to proceed to a jury trial. If you have been injured in an Ohio car accident, call the experienced attorneys at Gounaris Abboud, LPA, at 937-222-1515, or contact us online for a free consultation. We have nearly five decades of combined legal experience, and we know how to negotiate with insurance companies to get the full settlement you deserve.

Read More

Your Driving Under Suspension in Ohio Questions Answered If you get caught for driving with a suspended driver’s license in Ohio, you could face jail time and hefty fines. The penalties you face will depend on the reason the court originally suspended your license. If you are convicted of driving under suspension (DUS), you could also face an even longer suspension of your license. What Is the Penalty for Driving with a Suspended License in Ohio? In Ohio, driving under suspension is typically a first-degree misdemeanor offense that carries up to six months in jail. You also face up to $1,000 in fines. The court may also: Impound your license plates, Immobilize your vehicle, or Order you to perform community service. If you are convicted a third time for DUS, you face criminal forfeiture of your vehicle. Finally, you will face an extension of your license suspension of up to one year. When you do get your license back, you must pay reinstatement and service fees. You may also have to take a driving course and a written test to get your license back. Repeat DUS offenses could subject you to having your driver license revoked permanently. What Are the Possible Reasons for Driver License Suspension in Ohio? You can lose your driver license in Ohio for reasons that include: OVI/DUI conviction, Reckless operation of a vehicle, Lack of registration or insurance, Default on your child support, and Excessive traffic violations. If you fail to appear for a court date or default on a judgment, the court also has the option of suspending your license. One of the most common reasons for license suspension is getting arrested for DUI or OVI. When the police arrest you on DUI charges, your license is automatically suspended. You can appeal the suspension through the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV). However, you have only five days to formally request an administrative hearing to appeal. Note that these charges can potentially be reduced or eliminated with the help of a DUI defense lawyer. How a Criminal Defense Lawyer Can Help with Ohio DUS Driving with a suspended license in Ohio puts you at risk for a variety of harsh penalties. Repeat offenses place you at an even greater risk for jail time and fines. For these reasons, talking to a criminal defense lawyer about your options is critical. Because Ohio DUS penalties can be so harsh, your attorney may recommend appealing your suspension if possible. The process for appeal can be daunting, and unless you understand how this process works, you may lose your appeal. Having an attorney to represent you at your BMV hearing will give you the best chance of success. Talk to a Lawyer for Help if You Were Arrested for Driving Under Suspension in Ohio If you face charges in Ohio for driving under suspension, contact a criminal or DUI defense lawyer as soon as possible. Your attorney can ensure you understand your options and help you make the best choice for your future. In Ohio, Gounaris Abboud, LPA helps clients fight to regain and keep their driving privileges. With more than five decades of experience, we can assist you with even the most challenging of criminal matters, including DUS charges. Contact us today, or call us at 937-222-1515.

Read More
Ohio Theft Laws

Your Questions About Ohio Theft Laws Answered Ohio theft law involves two general questions: Has a theft occurred, and if so, what penalty might apply? Because theft is a crime in Ohio, committing theft can lead to criminal penalties. These can include a fine, jail or prison time, or both. Contact an experienced defense attorney if you face a theft charge in Ohio. A defense attorney can help you understand the charges against you, potential penalties, and defense strategies. OHIO THEFT LAWS FAQ Did a Theft Crime Occur Under Ohio Theft Laws? First, it is important to understand what conduct is considered theft under Ohio’s theft law. Ohio theft law makes it a crime to knowingly obtain or exert control over another person’s property or services by unlawful means. Taking another’s property is unlawful when it is: Without the owner’s consent; Beyond the scope of the owner’s permission; By deception; By threat; or By intimidation Also, the Ohio theft law requires that the person take the property or service with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of that property or service. For example, it is not theft to take another person’s bicycle without their permission if you intend to return it after a short ride around the block. It is theft, however, to take the bike intending to ride off and never return. If a person unlawfully takes the property of another with the intent to deprive the owner of that property permanently, then that person committed a theft. OHIO THEFT LAWS FAQ What Criminal Penalties Apply Under Ohio Theft Laws? If a theft occurred, the next question to ask is, what penalties might apply upon conviction? The penalties that apply depend on the seriousness of the theft. The least serious class of theft is petty theft which is classified as a misdemeanor. More serious theft offenses are felony offenses. Ohio’s theft laws classify theft as petty theft or felony theft based on the value of the property or services stolen. The type of property can also determine the class of the offense. Ohio’s theft laws supply criminal penalties for each type of petty and felony theft offense. In general, the more serious the theft offense, the more severe the penalty. PETTY THEFT OHIO FAQ Ohio Petty Theft Laws Ohio theft laws outline when theft qualifies as petty theft. Petty theft occurs when the value of the property stolen is less than $1,000. Ohio petty theft laws make petty theft a misdemeanor offense. Petty theft in Ohio is punishable by a maximum fine of $1,000 and up to 180 days in jail.  FELONY THEFT OHIO FAQ Ohio Felony Theft Laws In Ohio, theft is a felony if the value of the property stolen is more than $1,000. Felony theft can be in the first, second, third, fourth, or fifth degree. The least severe penalties apply to fifth-degree felony theft, which is the least serious type of felony theft offense. First-degree felony theft is the most serious type of theft offense, and it carries the most severe punishment. Fifth-Degree Felony Theft Theft is a fifth-degree felony when the value of the stolen property or services is between $1,000 and $7,500. Theft is also a fifth-degree felony when the property taken is: A negotiable instrument, such as a credit card, debit card, or check, or A vehicle license plate or temporary placard, a blank vehicle title form, or a blank driver’s license form. Fifth-degree felony theft is punishable by a fine up to $2,500 and a prison sentence between six and 12 months. Fourth-Degree Felony Theft (Grand Theft) What is the penalty for grand theft in Ohio? Theft is a fourth-degree felony, also called grand theft, when the value of the property or services have taken between $7,500 and $150,000. Grand theft also results when the stolen property is a: Motor vehicle or Dangerous drug The penalty for grand theft includes a fine of up to $5,000 and a prison sentence between six and 18 months. Third-Degree Felony Theft (Aggravated Theft) Third-degree felony theft is theft of property that is worth more than $150,000 but less than $750,000. The theft is also a third-degree felony offense when the property was stolen is a: Firearm or Anhydrous ammonia. Penalties for third-degree felony theft include a maximum fine of $10,000 and between one and five years in prison. Second-Degree Felony Theft (Aggravated Theft) Second-degree felony theft results when the value of the stolen property is between $750,000 and $1,500,000. Felony theft in the second degree is punishable by a fine up to $15,000 and a minimum prison sentence between two and eight years. First-Degree Felony Theft (Aggravated Theft) When property or services have taken are worth more than $1,500,000, the theft is a first-degree felony. Criminal penalties for felony theft of the first degree include a fine up to $20,000 and a minimum prison sentence between three and 11 years. OHIO THEFT LAW FAQ Facing Theft Charges in Ohio? Contact a Defense Lawyer at Gounaris Abboud, LPA If you are facing a theft crime charge, your next step is to seek help from an experienced defense lawyer. At Gounaris Abboud, LPA, our job is to protect your rights. The theft crimes defense lawyers at Gounaris Abboud can help you understand the charges you face and explain how to present your best defense. To learn more about how the defense lawyers at Gounaris Abboud, LPA, can protect you, contact our office today at (937) 222-1515 to schedule a free initial case evaluation.

Read More
ohio felony sentencing

Ohio felony sentencing laws classify felony crimes into five categories, or degrees, ranging from most serious to least serious. Felonies can be first, second, third, fourth, or fifth-degree offenses. Felonies can be first, second, third, fourth, or fifth-degree offenses. First-degree felonies are the most serious class of felony, and fifth-degree felonies are the least serious. Felony sentencing laws in Ohio also include unclassified felony offenses. Unclassified felonies are not categorized by degree. These are very serious offenses. Felony Crimes by Class & Sentence Each felony category corresponds to a specific sentencing range. The sentence is proportional to the seriousness of the offense. More serious felonies get longer prison sentences. Ohio felony sentencing laws may also require mandatory minimum sentences for certain felony offenses. First- and Second-Degree Felonies First-degree felonies are the most severe category of offenses. For example, first-degree felonies include: Voluntary manslaughter, Kidnapping, and Rape The minimum Ohio felony sentences for a first-degree felony range from three to 11 years in prison. Second-degree felonies are the next most serious level of offenses. These offenses include, for example: Aggravated arson, and Felonious Assault Second-degree felonies can result in minimum prison sentences from two to eight years. Indefinite Sentences for First- and Second-Degree Felonies A new Ohio felony sentencing law requires indefinite sentencing for certain first- and second-degree felony offenses. First- and second-degree felonies committed on or after March 22, 2019, and that are not subject to life in prison are punishable by indefinite sentencing. Indefinite sentencing means that a judge will select a minimum sentence from the specified range of penalties. The judge will then determine the maximum term by adding 50% of the minimum term. For example, if a defendant is convicted of kidnapping, a first-degree felony, the judge may select a minimum term of six from the specified sentencing range. The maximum term, in this case, would be nine years. Find Out More Information From Our Blog This is because 50% of the minimum term of six years is three years, which is then added to the minimum term for a total of nine years. The defendant, thus, will serve six to nine years in prison. Third-Degree Felonies Some third-degree felonies are subject to longer sentences ranging between one and five years. Offenses subject to the longer sentencing include, for example: Aggravated vehicular assault or homicide, Unlawful sexual conduct with a minor, and Assisting suicide. However, most third-degree felonies are punishable by shorter sentences ranging between nine months and three years. Are You Being Charged with a Felony? Fill out the confidential form below describing the details of what you are being charged for and then we can begin to evaluate your case. Fourth-Degree Felonies Crimes classified as fourth-degree felonies include, for example: Aggravated assault, Vehicular assault, and Grand theft of an automobile. Felony sentencing in Ohio for fourth-degree felonies can range between six and 18 months in prison. Fifth Degree Felonies Fifth-degree felonies are considered the least serious felonies. Examples of fifth-degree felony offenses include: Breaking and entering, Forgery, Gambling, and Receiving stolen property. In Ohio, felony sentences for fifth-degree offenses range between six and 12 months in prison. Unclassified Felonies Unclassified felonies are felonies that are not classified by degree. Unclassified felonies include, for example: Murder, and Aggravated murder. Ohio law supplies specific sentences for unclassified felonies. Sentences for aggravated murder, for instance, can include death, life without the possibility of parole, or life with the possibility of parole after 20 years. In Ohio, felony sentences for murder range from 15 years in prison to life in prison. Mandatory Sentences Ohio felony sentencing laws may also impose mandatory prison terms in some cases. For example, Ohio requires mandatory sentences for aggravated murder, murder, rape, or attempted rape of a child under the age of 13, and first- or second-degree felony drug trafficking. In these cases, a court must impose a sentence or sentence range specified for the offense. Contact an Experienced Ohio Felony Sentencing Lawyer Ohio felony sentencing is complicated and depends on the specific circumstances of each case. If you face a felony charge, it is imperative to your defense that you speak with a lawyer experienced in felony sentencing in Ohio. At Gounaris Abboud, LPA, we have over 50 years of combined experience in criminal defense. The defense lawyers at Gounaris Abboud, LPA, can help you understand your case and can discuss possible defenses to overcome your charges. We offer a free initial case consultation. To schedule yours, contact our legal team today at (937) 222-1515. TLDR; Quick Reference Section First-degree felonies include: Voluntary manslaughter, Kidnapping, and Rape Second-degree felonies include: Aggravated arson, and Felonious Assault Third-degree felonies can include: Aggravated vehicular assault or homicide, Unlawful sexual conduct with a minor, and Assisting suicide Fourth-degree felonies can include: Aggravated assault, Vehicular assault, and Grand theft of an automobile Fifth-degree felonies can include: Breaking and entering, Forgery, Gambling, and Receiving stolen property.

Read More

Have you or a loved one been charged with a felony in Ohio? If so, you’ll want to know what to expect from your preliminary hearing. When a defendant is charged with a felony in Ohio, a preliminary hearing will be scheduled in the local municipal court. According to the United States Department of Justice (DOJ), a preliminary hearing determines if there is probable cause to hold the defendant. This hearing also determines if the criminal case should move forward in the legal process. Here, our criminal defense team answers questions about what to expect at a preliminary hearing in Ohio. Ohio Preliminary Hearing: Understanding the Basics What is a Preliminary Hearing? A preliminary hearing is a type of screening procedure. At the hearing, there will be a review of the prosecution’s evidence to ensure that there is reasonable cause to hold a defendant in jail or apply bond conditions. What is the Timeline for a Preliminary Hearing? When a preliminary hearing is used instead of a grand jury, it will occur right after an arrest. Prosecutors must hold a preliminary hearing within ten days if the defendant is being held in custody or within fifteen days if the defendant was released from custody. To protect your rights, consult with an experienced Dayton, OH criminal defense lawyer before your preliminary hearing. What Actually Happens at a Preliminary Hearing in Ohio? A preliminary hearing proceeds in the same way as a trial. First, the prosecution has an opportunity to lay out its evidence. For the defendant, this is a critical first look at the prosecution’s case. Under Ohio law (Ohio Revised Code § 2937.12), the prosecution must prove probable cause. If they fail to do so, they defendant can petition for discharge after the hearing. How Should I Prepare for a Preliminary Hearing? If you have a preliminary hearing in Ohio, seek representation from an experienced criminal defense lawyer. Your attorney will be able to build a proper defense strategy for the trial. Get Help From Our Dayton, OH Criminal Defense Attorneys Right Away At Gounaris Abboud, LPA, our Ohio criminal defense lawyers are strong advocates for our clients. If you or your loved one was charged with a crime, we are here to help. To set up a free, no-obligation analysis of your case, please contact our law firm today. With offices located in Dayton and Springboro, we represent defendants throughout the region.

Read More
2nd ovi in ohio

The penalties for a second OVI in Ohio increase with each conviction. If you were arrested after being convicted in the past, your punishment could be far more severe than it was the first time. First, get an Ohio DUI defense attorney as soon as possible to help fight your charges. Next, you’ll need to understand what to expect from a DUI second offense. Overview of Ohio DUI Laws: Before getting to the punishments for a second conviction of drunk driving, you need to know the basics. Instead of driving under the influence (DUI), Ohio uses the term Operating a Vehicle Impaired (OVI). There are two scenarios where you could be arrested for drunk driving in Ohio: Police officers stopped you and asked you to take a breathalyzer test, which measured a blood alcohol content (BAC) of .08% or more; or, Officers pulled you over and had a reasonable suspicion that you were impaired by alcohol. Note that two different standards measure your BAC. You’re considered to have a “low” amount of alcohol if a chemical test reveals a BAC of .08% to .17%. However, you may be arrested for high OVI if your BAC exceeds .17%. Increased Penalties for a Conviction: If you’re charged with drunk driving under the above circumstances and you have a prior conviction, you will be charged with an Ohio DUI second offense. Your sentence may include: At least 10 days in jail, though a judge could increase this term to up to six months in jail; Fines ranging from $525 up to $1,500; and, A driver’s license suspension for at least one year and up to four years. Keep in mind other consequences: If your BAC is above .17%, your mandatory jail sentence is at least 20 days. When the car you were driving is your own, the police will impound it; you cannot recover it without a court order. Though a judge may allow you limited driving privileges, you do not qualify for at least 45 days after your arrest. Contact an Ohio OVI/DUI Lawyer for Assistance in Fighting the Charges If you’ve been arrested for a 2nd OVI in Ohio, it’s critical to understand the punishment you could face. A conviction will hit your wallet, but there are also implications for your freedoms. For more information on your case and help fighting the charges, please contact Gounaris Abboud, LPA. We can answer your questions and provide more information after reviewing your case.

Read More
ovi ohio first offense

Intoxicated driving is one of the most common criminal charges in Ohio. The Ohio State Highway Patrol reports that 19,008 people were arrested on OVI charges in the state in 2018 alone. No matter the specific circumstances, an OVI charge is always a serious matter. Even a first-time OVI conviction could result in a defendant facing severe penalties. Here, our Dayton defense lawyers give an overview of the Ohio OVI laws. We will also explain what to expect if you are facing a first-time intoxicated driving offense. OVI Ohio First Offense: What Am I Facing? Under Ohio law (Ohio Revised Code § 4511.19), it is unlawful to operate a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Ohio has graduated penalties for OVI offenses. This means a defendant will face worse penalties with each intoxicated driving offense. Still, a first-time OVI is not a minor issue. Among other things, the penalties for a DUI in Ohio first offense may include: Up to $1,075 in fines and fees; Other financial penalties and increased insurance costs; At least three days in jail or a three-day Driver Intervention Program; Up to six months in prison; and A license suspension of up to three years. Administrative Penalties: Your License Will Be Automatically Suspended — Unless You Act If you get charged with a drunk driving offense in Ohio, your license will be suspended before you get a hearing on your case. You can take action to stop this. Contact an experienced OVI Ohio defense lawyer after your drunk driving arrest. You have 30 days to request a hearing to argue the automatic suspension. You May Face Additional Penalties if Other ‘Aggravating Factors’ are Present A history OVI offenses is not the only factor that impacts the criminal penalties in these cases. A defendant could be charged with a more severe OVI offense if: They were highly intoxicated — a BAC level above .17; The accident occurred resulted in significant property damage or an injury; There was a minor present within the vehicle; or Other traffic offenses, such as reckless driving, were committed at the same time. Speak to a DUI Defense Attorney in Dayton, Ohio At Gounaris Abboud, LPA, our Ohio drunk driving defense lawyers have more than 50 years of experience protecting the rights of our clients. If you or a family member was arrested for a first-time OVI offense, we can help. To arrange a free, no obligation analysis of your case, please contact our law firm right away. With offices in Dayton and Springboro, we serve clients throughout the region, including in Montgomery County, Warren County, and Butler County.

Read More
difference between federal and state crimes

Facing criminal charges causes a lot of anxiety. After being charged with an offense, you need an experienced Ohio criminal defense attorney on your side. How do you know how to find the best lawyer for your case when you don’t understand your charges? What’s the difference between federal and state crimes? There are both common questions that we’ll answer for you below Learning More About the Difference Between Federal and State Crimes Understanding the difference between state and federal felony charges can be confusing. Many crimes can be charged either as state or felony offenses. State and federal courts often have concurrent jurisdiction for a crime, meaning that state or federal authorities can arrest and prosecute someone. Ohio state criminal offenses have different elements of the crime than federal charges. State convictions may also carry different penalties under Ohio law than federal convictions. State Felony vs. Federal Felony Charges in Ohio What are federal charges? When can a person expect to face federal charges instead of state charges? There are many situations where a crime may be a federal offense rather than a state offense. The following are the most common reasons that a person faces federal charges instead of state charges under Ohio law: Crime occurs on federal property; Crime involves interstate connections, or movement across state borders (i.e., from Ohio into Pennsylvania); Crime involves a federal government agency or investigation by a federal government agency such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), or the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF); or Crime is part of a larger operation or investigation by a federal agency or an investigation that involves individuals in more than one state. Were you recently charged with a crime? If you were recently charged with a crime text us the details   Text Us on Mobile For Free Case Analysis Examples of Federal Crimes vs. State Crimes Examples of types of crimes that are charged as federal crimes include: Weapons charges; White-collar financial crimes; Computer crimes; Internet sex crimes; Organized crime; and Drug trafficking Examples of crimes that are charged under state law rather than federal law include: Homicide; Robbery; Burglary; Assault and battery; Drug possession (small amounts); and Theft offenses. In some situations, crimes that are usually charged under state law can be charged as federal offenses. For example, if a robbery or burglary charge is related to a large-scale criminal organization that has been operating across state lines, the charges will be federal. Seek Advice from an Ohio Criminal Defense Attorney If you have questions about criminal charges in Ohio or need help building a defense, our Ohio criminal defense attorney is here to help. Contact Gounaris Abboud to get started on your defense today. FAQ Section

Read More
2019 super lawyers list

Gouaris Abboud, LPA is proud to announce the selection of founding partner Tony Abboud to the 2019 Super Lawyers® in Ohio list. Each year, lawyers nominate their peers for this prestigious recognition; the final published list represents no more than 5% of the lawyers in the state. Candidates must then pass a rigorous selection process of evaluations based on indicators such as professional achievement in order to be included. About Super Lawyers Super Lawyers, a Thomson Reuters company, is a rating service of outstanding lawyers from over 70 practice areas who have attained a high-degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. Top attorneys are selected using a patented multiphase selection process that combines peer nominations and evaluations with independent research. All attorneys selected for inclusion in Super Lawyers, regardless of year, can be found on SuperLawyers.com. About Tony Abboud Antony “Tony” Abboud is a partner and one of the founders of Gounaris Abboud, LPA. Mr. Abboud earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice Studies with a minor in Political Science from the University of Dayton. He completed his Juris Doctor from the University Of Dayton School Of Law and went on to pursue a successful law career as one of the Miami Valley’s premier and criminal defense attorneys before joining our firm. Mr. Abboud has been voted to the Super Lawyers® Rising Stars℠ list consecutively from 2011 to 2014 and has been selected to Super Lawyers® from 2015 to 2019. In 2012, Mr. Abboud was given a 10.0 “Superb” rating by Avvo, which is an attorney rating website recognized around the nation. The National Association Trial Lawyers also named Mr. Abboud to the list of the Top 100 Trial Lawyers. Contact Gouaris Abboud, LPA Today Do you need high-quality representation in a criminal defense or family law matter? At Gouaris Abboud, LPA, our Dayton lawyers have over 50 years of collective experience and can provide you with the individualized representation you deserve, whether you have been arrested for drinking and driving or you have a child custody issue to iron out. We can work hard for you to obtain the best outcome possible and to minimize the stress of navigating the legal system. Call 937-222-1515 or contact us online to schedule a free case evaluation. We are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Read More