statute of limitations on forgery signature

If you have signed another person’s name without their knowledge or permission, you may be worried about the possible legal ramifications. You may be wondering what forgery is, whether it is a crime, and, if so, what the statute of limitations on forgery signature crimes is. In this article, we will address those matters and more as we look at the ins and outs of forgery laws in Ohio. Is Forgery of a Signature a Crime? Yes! Forgery laws in Ohio are part of the  Ohio Code of Crimes and Procedures. In these statutes, the judicial system makes it clear that it is a violation of Ohio forgery laws to fabricate or create any writing or portion of a writing. This includes executing or altering a signature. More specifically, the Theft and Fraud Criminal Code states that it is illegal to: Forge any writing of another without the other person’s authority; Forge any writing so that it purports to be genuine when it is not; or Be engaged in issuing, publishing, using, transferring, delivering, displaying, or sending any writing that the person knows to have been forged. Forging, selling, or distributing identification cards (fake IDs) also violates forgery laws in Ohio. Consequences for violating Ohio forgery laws can include fines in the thousands of dollars and prison time. Statute of Limitations on Forgery of a Signature The statute of limitations is the time frame during which law enforcement may bring a case against you after the commission of the crime. The general time limits in Ohio are: Six years for felonies, Two years for misdemeanors, and Six months for minor misdemeanors. While the above is accurate for most cases, there are a few variations, including some crimes involving forgery. For instance, if the forgery offense consists of a breach of fiduciary duty or misconduct by a public servant, law enforcement may have more time to address the crime. It is always critical to have a highly respected attorney review your situation and determine the statute of limitations.  What You Should Do If You Are Facing Forgery Charges If there is any possibility that law enforcement will charge you with forgery or if they already have charged you, you should immediately contact an attorney. Forgery of a signature can create a legal problem that puts your freedom at risk. Therefore, mounting a solid defense right away is crucial. Contact a criminal defense legal team at once, and let them protect and defend you. Look for a reputable firm that will provide a free case analysis. Ohio forgery laws lend themselves to prosecution and punishment. Now that you know the answer to your question of is signature forgery a crime and that forgery is a serious crime, you must react accordingly. Hire a lawyer you can trust who will support and defend you. Gounaris Abboud, LPA: Ready to Work on Your Case Gounaris Abboud, LPA, has more than 50 years of collective experience. Our firm provides high-quality, dedicated legal counsel to our clients. When you need outstanding criminal defense in Ohio, Gounaris Abboud, LPA, should be your first and only call. Call us now at 937-222-1515 or reach out online for a free case analysis.

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probation-violation-ohio

Choosing an Experienced Ohio Probation Defense Attorney Could Help You Achieve the Best Possible Outcome for Your Case Ohio courts refer to probation as “community control.” Community control means that a judge allowed you to live in the community after a conviction for a criminal offense instead of going to jail. Typically, the court will impose sanctions or restrictions on your liberty while you serve your time on probation. Failing to meet your conditions leads to severe probation violation consequences in Ohio. If you face a probation violation in Ohio, you should speak with a lawyer who has substantial experience defending probation violations. As we will explain, a judge has significant power over you while you are in a community control program. Aligning yourself with a law firm that has a reputation for fighting for its clients and winning the toughest fights might be your best chance to avoid incarceration. What Are the Possible Probation Violation Consequences in Ohio? Probation is a valuable tool in American courts. Not every offender deserves jail as punishment for every crime, and many people benefit from their time on community control. People get help to overcome the challenges that lead them into the criminal justice system with probation. Probation is essentially a contract. The terms of the agreement are simple: the judge promises not to put you in jail or prison if you abide by probation terms. Your probation ends when you complete the requirements the judge imposed or you violate your probation. What Does the Court Consider a Probation Violation in Ohio? Breaking any of the terms of your community control is a probation violation. Some people face probation violation consequences in Ohio because they did not complete a program or failed a drug test. Some courts refer to these violations as “technical violations.” Others have a probation violation in Ohio because they face new criminal charges. Your probation officer can ask for a warrant to arrest you if you violate probation. The judge may order you held in jail until the final probation hearing. You might not be able to post bond if the judge determines that is necessary. Three Possible Outcomes for an Ohio Probation Violation You have the right to a hearing before the judge revokes your probation. You can present evidence that could help you at the hearing, and you have the right to cross-examine witnesses. These valuable due process protections ensure that a court does not revoke your probation unlawfully. Having an aggressive Ohio probation violation defense lawyer will safeguard your rights to a fair hearing. After a hearing, the judge has three options: Enter a finding of “no violation”; Find you in violation of probation and reprobate or extend probation—sometimes judges will add more conditions to your community control; or Find you in violation of your probation, revoke your probation, and sentence you to prison or jail. The judge has broad discretion when it comes to probation violation hearings. You stand a better chance of convincing the judge that you should remain on probation instead of going to jail with a dedicated defense lawyer skilled in representing people with a probation violation in Ohio. How Can a Gounaris Abboud Criminal Defense Lawyer Help You Avoid Probation Violation Consequences in Ohio? Contact an Ohio probation violation defense lawyer from Gounaris Abboud as soon as you learn that you violated community control. You stand the best chance to correct the violation before landing in jail. Our firm will work with your probation officer to rectify any issues so that you can continue on your path to rehabilitation. If police allege you committed a new crime, we will aggressively fight the new case and your probation violation.  Contact Gounaris Abboud, LPA, today at 937-222-1515 to speak with our award-winning criminal defense attorneys recognized as Super Lawyers in Ohio for the last decade.  

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corruption-of-a-minor

Defending a Charge of Corruption of a Minor in Ohio Requires Representation from an Impassioned Ohio Criminal Defense Attorney You have options if police in Ohio charge you with the corruption of a minor. A conviction for corruption of a minor charge in Ohio could mean you face significant jail time, along with other life-altering consequences. Therefore, you need to contact an Ohio defense attorney who has the knowledge and skill to help you achieve the best result for your case. You deserve the best defense possible for your charges of corruption of a minor. Our team of tough, dependable, and aggressive criminal defense lawyers from Gounaris Abboud understands that you demand results. Our experienced criminal defense lawyers approach each case passionately. Call us today to preserve your future.  What Does Corruption of a Minor Mean? The Ohio Revised Code considers corruption of a minor a sex crime. The law states that a person who is 18 or older engaging in sexual conduct with a person between 13 and 16 years old is a crime, as long as the two people are unmarried.  The prosecution must prove that the accused knew, or acted recklessly in not knowing, that the victim’s age fell between 13 and 16 when the sexual conduct occurred. What Are the Potential Penalties for Corruption of a Minor in Ohio? The penalties for the corruption of a minor vary depending on the circumstances of the case.  The penalties range from a misdemeanor to a felony. If convicted of corruption of a minor, you face A first-degree misdemeanor if you and the alleged victim are less than four years apart; A fourth-degree felony if you are more than four years, but fewer than 10 years older than the alleged victim; A third-degree felony if you are more than 10 years older than the alleged victim; and A second-degree felony if you have a prior conviction for a corruption of a minor charge. You face up to 180 days in jail for a first-degree misdemeanor conviction. However, you could serve between two and eight years and pay a $15,000 fine for a second-degree felony conviction in Ohio. You need a criminal defense attorney with substantial experience by your side to achieve the best result for you if you face charges of corruption of a minor.  Collateral Consequences for Corruption of a Minor in Ohio Corruption of a minor is a sexually motivated crime in Ohio. The judge could sentence you to counseling designed to treat sex offenders. Also, the court will order you to register as a sex offender. Additionally, any conviction for a sex offense could have the consequence of deportation, exclusion from the U.S., or denial of your naturalization rights. You might also find it hard to land a good job with a sex crime on your record. And it may be difficult to locate adequate housing or apply for federal funding with a felony conviction on your record. Defending a Corruption of a Minor Charge Begins with a High-Quality Legal Team A criminal charge is simply an allegation of wrongdoing. You have rights that protect you. However, you must act swiftly to obtain the services of a dedicated attorney specializing in Ohio criminal defense.  Our award-winning criminal defense attorneys with Gounaris Abboud could give you the edge you need to walk away from a corruption of a minor charge. Call us today at 937-222-1515 to discuss your case with us. We are ready to fight to protect you and your future.

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murder-in-dayton-ohio-today

You Need Representation from an Experienced Murder Defense Lawyer Who Is Extremely Knowledgeable in the Law to Provide You with the Best Possible Defense If you are a suspect in a murder investigation or face murder charges in Dayton, Ohio, today, you and your family probably know how high the stakes are for you. No charge is more serious than murder. Accordingly, people convicted of murder face the stiffest penalties the criminal justice system in Ohio can impose. The police and prosecutors will stop at nothing to ensure they capture and convict the person who committed the crime. Their dedication to pursuing justice for the victim and the victim’s family means you need to have a lawyer who will do the same for you. Therefore, having a Dayton, Ohio murder defense lawyer with a wealth of experience defending serious criminal charges who also possesses an extraordinary knowledge of Ohio law on your side is necessary to ensure you receive the justice guaranteed to you by the Constitution. Murder Charges in Ohio Ohio law has created two categories of murder charges: aggravated murder and murder. You should understand the difference if you have charges of murder in Dayton, Ohio, today. What Is Murder Under Ohio Law? Murder is the unlawful killing of another or unlawful termination of another’s pregnancy. Ohio law also defines murder as causing the death of another person while committing a felony in the first or second degree, unless those felonies are voluntary or involuntary manslaughter.  A conviction or a guilty plea to murder carries a prison sentence between 15 years and life, along with a fine of no more than $15,000. Murder charges can be accompanied by enhanced charges such as: The victim was younger than 13;  The accused had a sexual motivation to commit the crime; or The accused is a sexually violent predator and had a sexual motivation to commit the crime. Murder charges under these circumstances allow the judge to sentence the offender to 30 years to life, or life without parole, depending on the case. What Is Aggravated Murder According to Ohio Law? Aggravated murder in Ohio is the purposeful killing of another or unlawful termination of a pregnancy with “prior calculation and design.” The mental element of the charge is often referred to as “malice aforethought.” Examples of killing with prior calculation and design are lying in wait to kill, poisoning, or drowning the victim.  Ohio law punishes several other killings as aggravated murder as well. A person could face aggravated murder charges for: Purposely killing another while committing, attempting to commit, or fleeing from kidnapping, rape, arson, aggravated arson, robbery, aggravated robbery, burglary, aggravated burglary, trespass in a home when someone is there, escape, or terrorism; Purposely killing a person younger than 13; Intentionally causing the death of another after escaping detention following the conviction of a felony;  Intentionally killing a law enforcement officer or killing a law enforcement officer in the line of duty; or Purposely killing a military member or first responder because the victim was a first responder or in the military. A person convicted of aggravated murder in Ohio faces the death penalty or life in prison without parole. The court could assess a fine not to exceed $25,000 as well. What Could a Dayton, Ohio Murder Defense Attorney Do For You? You need a dedicated advocate who will strive to find justice if you face charges alleging murder in Dayton, Ohio. Having the overworked public defender in your corner means you are just another file. However, with an experienced Dayton, Ohio murder defense lawyer fighting for you, you will have a zealous advocate who will: Prioritize your case; Examine every piece of evidence closely; Investigate third-party culprits, find independent witnesses, and look for ways to discredit the state’s witnesses; and Argue the best defenses to win your case or weaken the state’s case so that you receive a reduced charge. The potential defenses an experienced Dayton, Ohio criminal defense lawyer could use depends on the circumstances of each case. Experience the Difference Aggressive Representation Could Make for You Our dedicated and experienced murder defense attorneys with Gounaris Abboud, LPA, have distinguished themselves throughout their careers. Our murder defense team includes an acting judge, former magistrate, and former prosecutor. We are aggressive advocates for our clients facing capital crimes like murder. Guided by our extensive experience, our team will assemble the best defense possible guaranteed by the Constitution. Call our office today at 937-222-1515 or visit our website to learn how we could help you defend your charges of murder in Dayton, Ohio.

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pornography-laws-in-ohio

The United States Constitution and Ohio laws provide citizens with a great deal of freedom and privacy. However, all these rights are tempered by restrictions aimed to protect minors from abuse and exploitation. As a result, there are pronography laws. Let’s take a look at Ohip laws of pornography to better understand these restrictions. Is Watching Porn Illegal in Ohio Always? Pornography, otherwise know as porn, generally involves viewing sexual acts for sexual pleasure.  Watching pornography is not always illegal. In fact, Ohio recognizes that adults have the right to view pornographic images and in many ways does not interfere with this right. However, there are some restrictions. When law enforcement believes that a person violated the Ohio pornography laws, they will arrest them, the government will prosecute them, and the accused will need our veteran criminal defense firm.  What Types of Pornography Do Ohio Porn Laws Restrict? In an effort to protect children from abuse and explotation, Ohio pornography laws heavily address child pornography. The Ohio Laws and Administrative Rules make it illegal to:   Produce,  Transport, Share,  Receive, or  Possess (view, own) child pornography.  Under Ohio laws of pornography, a child or minor is anyone under 18 years of age. It is important to note that viewing child pornography includes watching it in person, through the internet, on mobile devices, and via hard copy pictures. If you are concerned about whether something you have viewed is illegal, it is important to contact our criminal defense firm. We have sex crime experience and understand how Ohio courts have interpreted the Ohio porn laws. Our attorneys can discuss the specifics of your individual situation. If criminal defense is needed, we will work to get you the best result possible. Is Violating Pornography Laws a Serious Offense? Violation of Ohio porn laws can result in a felony conviction and a mandatory registration as a sex offender. Images of child pornography are not considered protected speech by the Constitution. In addition, child pornography is an offense for which there is strict liability, meaning that it is irrelevant whether the watcher knew the person they were viewing was a minor.  Therefore, when faced with any type of crime that has even a tenuous connection to child pornography, it is critial that the accused hire an exceptional child pornography lawyer. At Gounaris Abboud, our attorneys are not here to judge. Instead, they will work hard to defend you and protect your rights.   Gounaris Abboud, LPA: A Leading Ohio Criminal Defense Firm Our firm is led by award-winning criminal defense attorneys. We take pride in the fact that we consistently provide top notch representation and leave our clients highly satisfied with our service. To speak to an attorney for a free, no-obligation consultation, please contact us online or by calling 937-222-1515. Our goal is to protect you, and we are prepared to handle cases in Dayton and throughout Ohio. Don’t wait—get in touch with our legal team now.

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breaking and entering charge ohio

What You Need to Know If You Face a Charge of Breaking and Entering in Ohio Breaking and entering is a serious offense in Ohio. Police and prosecutors push hard to impose significant jail time for breaking and entering. Therefore, you need a tough and dedicated criminal defense lawyer to defend you against a breaking and entering charge. What Is Breaking and Entering? Under the Ohio Revised Code, breaking and entering is a fifth-degree felony. The charge of breaking and entering in Ohio relates to two criminal acts combined into one offense: trespass and theft.  The statute prohibits any person from using force, stealth, or deception to trespass in an unoccupied structure. Additionally, a conviction for breaking and entering requires proof of an intent to commit a theft offense or any felony.  An experienced breaking and entering defense lawyer will explain to you that the Ohio Revised Code breaking and entering law uses words that have particular meanings. Under this law, trespass means to enter or remain in any structure without permission. “Structure” is a term that refers to any building, car, truck, mobile home, outbuilding, shed, trailer, or dwelling. The word force means using any physical effort to gain entry. Meanwhile, stealth means trying to avoid discovery when entering. Lastly, deception involves a person trying to trick someone into allowing them to enter the structure.  Additionally, the police may bring a breaking and entering charge in Ohio when a person enters on the land or premises of another with the intent to commit any felony.  What Is the Possible Jail Time for Breaking and Entering? Any person convicted of a fifth-degree felony in Ohio faces a maximum term of one year in prison, with a minimum of six months in prison. The court may impose a fine of up to $2,500. The judge may also impose restitution during a term of probation. How Is Breaking and Entering in Ohio Different from Burglary? In Ohio, a burglary occurs when a person enters a home or structure and remains in the structure with an intent to commit a crime.  The severity of the crime increases if a person is in the dwelling or is likely to be within the dwelling. Additionally, the penalties for burglary increase when a person enters the building while armed.  A person convicted of burglary in Ohio could face up to a first-degree felony. Defenses for a Breaking and Entering Charge in Ohio Police and prosecutors will use all their resources to prove the case. However, proving a breaking and entering charge is difficult without solid eyewitness testimony or forensic evidence.  A seasoned criminal defense lawyer will develop a successful defense strategy after thoroughly reviewing all the evidence. However, an experienced criminal trial attorney understands how to attack eyewitness testimony and discredit forensic evidence to help protect your freedom. Fight Your Breaking and Entering Charge with the Help of Dedicated Criminal Lawyers If you face a charge of breaking and entering in Ohio, you need a tough defense team to stand by you and protect your rights. The award-winning criminal defense attorneys with Gounaris Abboud have the skill, knowledge, and dedication your case deserves. Call our criminal defense lawyers today for help with your breaking and entering charge at 937-222-1515 or contact us online.

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how to get license back after dui

Given the risks that drunk driving poses to the public, the state of Ohio takes drunk driving very seriously. For this reason, the penalties that one faces if charged with driving under the influence (DUI) or operating a vehicle under the influence (OVI) are severe.  Aside from the risk of jail time and fines, a DUI conviction in Ohio often leads to license suspension. The answer to the question of how to get a license back after a DUI differs based on the circumstances surrounding the charge. If you have prior DUIs, a license suspension lasts longer, and getting your license back is trickier. If you’re facing a DUI charge, it is important to know license suspension lengths and other penalties associated with a DUI in Ohio.  Like with any other criminal offense, if you face a DUI charge, you are innocent until proven guilty. Thus, the best way to avoid license suspension is to fight the charge with the help of an experienced DUI attorney. License Suspension for DUIs in Ohio Ohio state law refers to DUI license suspensions as administrative license suspensions (ALS). The law breaks an ALS into two different time periods. The first period is known as the “hard suspension” period. During a hard suspension period, driving privileges are revoked entirely. This means that regardless of where you need to go, you are not allowed to drive yourself.  After the initial hard suspension period, the courts can amend the terms of an ALS to allow for limited driving privileges. You are typically allowed to drive yourself to places like school, work, or medical appointments with limited driving privileges. The exact terms of limited driving privileges are up to a judge to decide. A judge will typically alter the limited driving terms depending on the case’s circumstances and your own personal circumstances. For example, someone with children in school will often be allowed to drive their children to and from school.  Ohio ALS Lengths The key factor that determines your ALS length is whether you have prior DUI convictions. The hard suspension time period in such a case is 15 days. After a first offense, this increases to one to five years total with a 30-day hard suspension period. A second DUI may bring license plate impoundment and vehicle immobilization for 90 days in addition to the ALS. For third, fourth, and fifth DUI convictions, the ALS period continues to increase. In addition to prior DUI convictions, a test refusal can increase the time of a license suspension. If you refuse a blood or breathalyzer test, Ohio law treats your ALS period the same as a high-tier second offense. Thus, your ALS will be between one and five years with 30 days hard suspension. A test refusal may also lead to vehicle immobilization and license plate impoundment for 90 days. If You Are Facing a DUI/OVI Charge in Ohio The best way to lessen the severity of an ALS suspension or avoid one entirely is to hire an experienced DUI defense attorney. The DUI defense attorneys at Gounaris Abboud, LPA, have more than 50 years combined experience. With them advocating on your behalf, you can be sure that you have the best help available. Gounaris Abboud, LPA, has the distinction of being on the top 100 list of The National Trial Lawyers and the top 100 list of attorneys in Ohio put together by Super Lawyers. The firm builds its foundation on four primary principles that guide its work: trustworthy, empathetic, honest, and supportive. If you’re facing an Ohio DUI charge, contact Gounaris Abboud, LPA’s DUI attorneys today for a free consultation.

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second degree misdemeanor

Facing criminal charges is a daunting prospect for anyone. On top of the risk of fines and jail time, having a criminal record can disrupt your life in a number of other ways. If you face second-degree misdemeanor charges, it is vitally important to understand the potential consequences that follow a conviction.  Potential Penalties for Second Degree Misdemeanors Ohio law splits misdemeanors into five different categories or levels. Ohio law bases the misdemeanor level on the seriousness of the crime. Minor misdemeanors are the least serious, and first degree misdemeanors are the most serious. The severity of punishment corresponds with the level of the crime. Above first-degree misdemeanors are fifth-degree misdemeanors.  In Ohio, second degree misdemeanors include theft, shoplifting, vandalism, and manufacturing or selling drug paraphernalia. Conviction of a second degree misdemeanor can bring two primary types of punishment in Ohio: a fine and jail time. The maximum incarceration period for a second-degree misdemeanor in Ohio is 90 days. The maximum fine is $750. If convicted of a second-degree felony, the punishment can include one or the other, or both. It is important to note that these are the maximum punishments that a judge can impose.  Mitigating Circumstances and Mitigating Punishments Punishment for a second degree misdemeanor may end up less severe than the maximum based on mitigating circumstances. Mitigating factors do not mean that a person did not commit a crime. Instead, they lessen the severity of a crime in the eyes of the law and society and thus lessen the imposed punishment’s severity. Mitigating factors include things like: Remorse of a perpetrator; The culpability of the victim; A perpetrator’s clean record; Irregular circumstances surrounding the crime; and Relative necessity. An experienced criminal defense attorney will work closely with you to figure out which mitigating factors they should present to the judge to lessen the severity of a second degree misdemeanor’s sentence.  Mitigating punishments may also lessen the severity of the jail time or fine imposed by the courts. Mitigating punishments include things like community service, probation, counseling, drug treatment, or license suspension. In some cases, a judge will impose a mitigating punishment of their own volition. However, in other cases, someone facing criminal charges and their defense attorney can ask for mitigating punishments themselves. A judge will assess the facts of the case and mitigating factors to determine whether circumstances warrant a mitigating punishment. How a Criminal Defense Attorney Can Help If you face a second degree misdemeanor charge, the best thing you can do for yourself is to hire an experienced criminal defense attorney. Your criminal defense attorney will work closely with you to hear your side of the story and craft a suitable defense for it. On top of the possibility of beating the case in court, your attorney can fight to have your case dismissed, argue for your sentence to be reduced or mitigated, or negotiate a plea bargain to drop the criminal charges to a lower level. An experienced criminal defense attorney is your best bet to beat or lessen the severity of criminal charges. Contact Us If You Are Facing a Second Degree Misdemeanor Charge in Ohio If you face a second-degree misdemeanor charge in Ohio, you may feel like you are against the world. However, you don’t have to be alone in your fight to protect yourself. Gounaris Abboud, LPA’s criminal defense attorneys can help you fight to prove your innocence. With over 50 years combined experience, the attorneys at Gounaris Abboud, LPA, have seen it all and helped countless clients. Our firm is bold in its criminal defense and not afraid to take on the most challenging cases. No matter what the charge is, Gounaris Abboud, LPA, is here to help, so contact us today for a free consultation.

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aggravated arson ohio

Laws, Penalties, and Defenses Anyone accused of setting fire to a building or car or causing serious risk of physical harm to another by setting a fire faces severe criminal penalties. Ohio arson laws call for significant prison time, especially for aggravated arson. Therefore you need to know what punishments you may be facing if police charged you with arson or opened an arson investigation naming you as a suspect. You need a strong, decisive, and accomplished Ohio arson defense lawyer to help you fight these charges. Remember, you remain innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. However, you must act quickly and seek the advice of a top-rated Ohio arson defense attorney before it is too late. Ohio Arson Laws In Ohio, arson means knowingly starting a fire or creating an explosion that: Creates a substantial risk of harm to another’s personal or real property without their consent; Causes or threatens to cause serious harm to property with the intent to defraud; Constitutes a danger of physical harm to a governmental building used for public purposes; Creates a substantial risk of harm by hiring someone to set fire with the intent to defraud; or Causes a substantial risk of setting a brush or wildfire.  The state prosecutor must prove you started the fire knowingly or to perpetrate a fraud. Proving that your actions caused or contributed to creating a fire is not enough to convict you if the prosecutor can’t prove intent. Aggravated Arson Ohio The law defines aggravated arson in Ohio as creating or causing a substantial risk of physical harm to another person by starting a fire. The police could also charge you with aggravated arson for damaging an occupied structure by starting a fire or sparking an explosion.  Similarly, paying someone to start a fire with the intent to harm a building is also aggravated arson. Prosecutors bringing charges of aggravated arson in Ohio must prove that you started a fire or sparked an explosion knowingly.  Ohio Arson Penalties Arson The potential penalties you face for arson in Ohio depend on the severity of the damage or the reasons for the fire. Arson with property damage of less than $500 is a first-degree misdemeanor. This offense carries a maximum fine of $1,000 and 180 days in jail. Alternatively, arson with property damage exceeding $500 is a fourth-degree felony. The prison sentence ranges from six months to 18 months and a fine of no more than $5,000. Arson with the intent to defraud is also punishable as a fourth-degree felony.  Arson with an agreement for hire is a third-degree felony. The maximum penalty for a third-degree felony is five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Aggravated Arson  Burning an occupied building is a second-degree felony in Ohio. A person convicted of aggravated arson as a second-degree felony faces between two and eight years in prison. Additionally, the court may impose a $15,000 fine.  Aggravated arson for hire and aggravated arson in which someone suffered a substantial risk of physical harm are first-degree felonies. The minimum penalty for a first-degree felony in Ohio is three to 11 years in prison.  Ohio Arson Defenses Your Ohio arson defense attorney will develop a case strategy with your best interests in mind. Depending on the facts of your case, you may be able to argue: Accident, Mistaken identity, Consent, or Rights violations. The best defense for you depends on many things. You can rely on an experienced Ohio arson defense lawyer to make the best case for you. Rely on Experience When It Matters Most Arson prosecutions are highly complex cases. You need an attorney with significant experience fighting for justice who also has the resources to assert a strong and convincing case for you. At Gounaris Abboud, our Ohio arson defense attorneys will fight for you. Call us today at 937-222-1515 or reach out to us online to launch your Ohio arson defense.

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statutory rape ohio

Having a Dedicated Ohio Criminal Attorney Can Help You Avoid Prison If You Face Charges of Rape in Ohio Ohio rape charges are severe. A conviction under rape laws in Ohio could leave you languishing in prison for years or even for life. Furthermore, you could face life-long secondary consequences arising from the conviction, such as having a felony conviction and registering as a sex offender. The police and prosecution may bring a charge against you for rape in Ohio based on little evidence. Sometimes all the police need is the word of just one person. You need tough, experienced, and savvy Ohio criminal defense lawyers who have an unrivaled track record of performance. Our rape defense lawyers will help create a defense that is best suited for you.  What Is Rape in Ohio? Rape in Ohio is found in R.C. 2907.02 and it provides that (1) “no person shall engage in sexual conduct with another who is not the spouse of the offender but is living separate and apart from the offender when any of the following apply….” The person impairs the persons judgment by administering a drug or other intoxicant, or by force, the threat of force, or deception, The person is less than 13 years of age (whether the offender knows the age of the person or not), The other person’s ability to resist is substantially impaired because of a mental or physical condition and the offender knows of this impairment. The statute also provides that rape means (2) that a person engages in sexual conduct with another when the offender purposely compels the other by force or threat of force. Penalties for Rape in Ohio The potential punishments for Ohio rape depend on a number of different factors but ALL are considered First Degree Felonies.  Sentences range from: A mandatory 3-11 years if someone is convicted of administering/drug/intoxicant or by force, if the defendant is less than 16 at the time of the offense and did not cause serious physical harm to the victim and the victim was 10 or older; the ability to resist was impaired by a mental or physical condition; A minimum of 5 years up to 11 years if someone is found to have administered a scheduled controlled substance; A mandatory 10 years to Life if the victim was under the age of 13; A mandatory 15 years to Life if the victim was under the age of 10; A mandatory 25 to Life OR Life Without Parole if the victim was under the age of 13 and the offender caused serious physical harm; or of the victim was 13 and the offender used force or a threat of force  Ohio Age of Consent Rape is described above can be boiled down to non-consensual sexual contact between two people. It is often committed by force, threat or fear.  Many people have heard of the term “statutory rape”.  “Statutory Rape” typically means that one of the participants is below the age of consent.  The age of consent in Ohio is 16 years of age.  Individuals age 15 and below do not have the ability to legally consent to sexual activity.  Ohio has other areas of the law to prosecute violations of the Age of Consent that include: Gross Sexual Imposition (may be either a fourth-degree or third-degree penalty), Sexual Battery (third-degree penalty), Sexual Imposition (misdemeanor of the third degree, and Unlawful Sexual Conduct with a Minor (may be a second, third or fourth-degree felony or a misdemeanor of the first degree) Contact Gounaris Abboud Today for a Free Case Evaluation! Our Ohio rape defense lawyers have significant experience defending tough cases. Call us today at 937-222-1515 for a free case evaluation. Let our defense team of former prosecutors and judges fight for justice on your behalf. Our 5-star Avvo rating and Super Lawyer status demonstrates that we put our clients’ needs first. Contact us today.

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